Duration
2 Years (6 trimesters)
Locations
Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane
Fees
Intake Dates

February, June, September

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International

CRICOS 075776J

JMC welcomes students from all over the world.
Find out more

Learn to design and develop characters and worlds – from concept to finished art – and create believable character performances and arresting graphical motion.

Specialise in what you are passionate about with a Bachelor of Creative Arts (Animation). Select from a list of major and minor streams to hone in on your skills as an animator. Choose to major in either 2D animation or 3D animation, or do both.

Add Game Design, CG (Computer Generated) Art or Production Art for the opportunity to combine both technical knowledge and artistic practice as you build a professional portfolio and expand your studio practice. Immerse yourself in an exciting journey from concept to finished product through the magic of visual storytelling.

Why Study Animation at JMC?

Course designed in consultation with Pixar & Animal Logic Artists
Take advantage of our 18 camera dedicated motion capture suites
Study abroad in Japan or exchange in the Netherlands

Technology & Facilities

During this course you will be able to access the Full Adobe Creative Cloud Suite, Autodesk Maya, Wacom Intuos Pro and Cintiq tablets, Animation lightboxes + line testers, ball and socket stop-motion rigs, Dragonframe stop-motion software, 18-camera motion-capture suites, VR facilities, green-screen studios, renderers (Redshift, Pixar RenderMan, Arnold), Substance Painter for texturing, Zbrush for sculpting, Compositing tools (After Effects, Nuke), Katana for Look Development and Shotgun Studio for Project Planning and Management.

Duration

In only 2 years you can graduate with a Bachelor degree thanks to our accelerated full-time course. Part-time study is also available to domestic students. International students may choose to complete the course in 3 years [CRICOS 058460D] rather than the accelerated 2 year option.

Students who have successfully completed 4 trimesters of the Bachelor programme may successfully graduate with an Associate Degree qualification.

The Dutch Exchange

Take your passion to Europe and spend an entire trimester at Fontys Academy for Creative Industries in the Netherlands. Collaborate with creative students from all over the world and build your international contacts along the way.

Japan Study Tour

Spend 12 days immersed in anime and manga creation classes at the Tokyo Design Technology Center and Osaka Animation College, and explore the pop culture of Japan. This selective unit includes visits to the Osamu Tezuka Manga Museum and the Kyoto International Manga Museum.

*Study Abroad programs will resume once international travel restrictions ease

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Curriculum

Students will have the opportunity to investigate widely used design processes, specifically the British Design Council’s “Double Diamond”, human-centred design practices, and “Agile” project management. This is the first of two units that take students through the full life span of a project, from brief to implementation. This first part covers the “first diamond”, from challenging the brief and discovery to conducting research, and developing insights - right through to identifying opportunity areas.

This unit introduces students to practices, processes, and tools utilised in animation, games and VFX. Students will work through a series of self-contained exercises, with mentoring support from lecturers, which will provide entry-level practical experience. These will primarily be completed during class time. Areas of focus may include design research, design sketching and visualisation, concept ideation, 3D modelling, surfacing, texturing, basic rigging, simple animation, rendering, colour grading, editing, game mechanics, simple programming, and delivery to different platforms. While students are not expected to achieve full competence in these skills, they will gain a practical grasp of the steps and thinking required to produce animation, games, and VFX. At the conclusion of this unit, students will be supported to make an informed decision regarding the focus streams they will choose in Trimester 2.

This unit introduces students to practices, processes, and tools utilised in animation, games and VFX. Students will work through a series of self-contained exercises, with mentoring support from lecturers, which will provide entry-level practical experience. These will primarily be completed during class time. Areas of focus may include design research, design sketching and visualisation, concept ideation, 3D modelling, surfacing, texturing, basic rigging, simple animation, rendering, colour grading, editing, game mechanics, simple programming, and delivery to different platforms. While students are not expected to achieve full competence in these skills, they will gain a practical grasp of the steps and thinking required to produce animation, games, and VFX. At the conclusion of this unit, students will be supported to make an informed decision regarding the focus streams they will choose in Trimester 2.

A Design unit that introduces students to basic concepts in visual design. With a mix of foundation concepts, hands-on exploratory creative exercises, and an introduction to important ideas and people in various visual design disciplines, it will provide a sound basis for students to build their individual specialisations on.

Games and Animation in Context provides students with a formal and contextual framework to discuss games and animation. Beginning with journalistic responses, and developing through to in-depth presentations, students will consider the context, express the experience, and identify the structural elements of a variety of contemporary and historical works. This unit also requires on and off-campus participation in contemporary exhibitions, screenings, and events.

In Lab I students are presented with the opportunity to develop and execute a small individual project utilizing the key skills they are focusing on in their streams. They must log required hours in the lab environment, and meet weekly with an assigned project supervisor who will act as a mentor and support person. A range of creative briefs will be provided covering potential projects in areas such as art and design, modelling, animation, game development, or hybrids of these. In addition to the creative work, students will be guided through planning, documenting, reporting, and reflecting on their work. Additional workshops may be provided where required to extend technical knowledge. Finished projects will form the basis of a portfolio to be built upon in successive trimesters.

* indicates elective stream unit (2D Animation Stream)

Students are introduced to the conventions and common principles that have developed over animation’s rich hundred-year history. Students will explore traditional frame-by-frame techniques including cut-out, stop-motion, and drawn animation underpinning and developing an understanding of principles of movement and the animation process. Work will be undertaken using both traditional hand-made and photographed techniques and newer digital versions of these.

* indicates elective stream unit (3D Animation Stream)

3D Animation I guides students through the analysis and application of key principles of animation in a 3D context at a basic level. Technical workflow and animation mechanics are illustrated through lectures, and ongoing practical exercises build foundational knowledge and skills.

* indicates elective stream unit (Production Art Stream)

Character Design introduces key design principles for the creation of memorable animation and game characters in a range of styles. Students will be introduced to fundamentals of form and construction, basics of anatomy and gesture through life drawing, and the visual development of characters from story contexts. Artwork workflow and finishing styles will be covered, along with unified approaches to developing a full cast. Industry practice in documentation and presentation will also be covered.

* indicates elective stream unit (CG Art Stream)

The unit focuses on general 3D art creation with an emphasis on process. Block-outs, low poly modelling in 3D, mesh optimisation, unwrapping, rendering to texturing, and project management, are all covered using a low poly diorama as a vehicle for the project. The final project is uploaded to an online real-time WebGL 3D viewer. The course begins with an introduction to the pipeline through the creation of simple prop objects such as telephone poles and signs. A scene block-out is then created and students work through the elements. For houses, a modular texturing approach is introduced along with stencils to reduce the number of textures. Finally, vegetation is created. Post-processing effects and lighting are added in the online viewer.

* indicates elective stream unit (Game Development Stream)

This unit provides a broad introduction to working within game editor systems, integrating art elements into projects. The use of 2D graphics programs will be developed in conjunction with 2D & 3D features in the engine. Students will be provided with a template for gameplay and will apply principles of design and technical art skills to develop a playable project. This will provide an overview of a range of core engine features and practical experience integrating content.

This unit addresses the technical and creative challenges and opportunities for still and moving graphic narrative. Beginning with storytelling in comics it progresses through storyboards, animatics and 3D layout or pre-vis. In the process the students are exposed to key principles of the depiction of time and space, and cinematic conventions in mise-en-scene, cinematography and editing.

* indicates elective stream unit (2D Animation Stream)

2D Animation II introduces techniques and styles of digital animation from the motion design sector. Students will learn to use digital graphic art and animation packages to design, prepare, and execute styles ranging from abstract graphics to typography, to stylized character animation.

* indicates elective stream unit (3D Animation Stream)

This unit covers how to set up a skeleton and rig for a character mesh, how to skin the mesh and weight it properly, how to add controls to the rig, user interface options, blend shapes, and testing of rigs. The unit provides the technical knowledge required for creating a fully controllable character for use in animation or game productions. Rigging is often sought as a secondary skill for animators and an understanding of rigging allows animators to exercise greater creative control over the character rigs they work with.

* indicates elective stream unit (Production Art Stream)

This unit focuses on design and drawing skills for the creation of three-dimensional props, vehicles, buildings and environments. There is a strong emphasis on perspective and volumetric drawing, accurate portrayal of physical detail and form, and the composition and layout of spaces. Drafting and rendering techniques and conventions are covered, as well as style and finish for concept art and production design.

* indicates elective stream unit (CG Art Stream)

This unit focuses on look development via surfacing, lighting, and rendering, and introduces software for use in creating textures. Students are introduced to creative and technical lighting approaches and systems in greater depth. Common materials and channels contextualising their use are explored. Texturing approaches inside specialist software are introduced with a focus on developing layered, matte based approaches for further customisation in a destination application. Procedural and semi-automated systems for look development will also be explored. Rendering strategies will be explored and the calculation of render times for quality output is examined.

* indicates elective stream unit (Game Development Stream)

Creating effective and tightly designed game prototypes is made possible only with an understanding of fundamental core programming concepts. This unit introduces game programming and game engine operation, by writing games-focused software scripts in the C# language using the Unity game engine Application Programming Interface (API). Students will complete a number of small games exercises and develop their own small coding project in an area of interest, learning the fundamentals of programming for game design practitioners of all fields – artists, designers, and programmers.

 

This unit exposes the student to a history of animation and games embedded into a broader notion of the visual narrative or experience. Studies will lead from early examples of sequential art through to current examples of new technology platforms, with attention paid to historical and social context, geographical and technical factors, and the interplay of commercial production with the artist and auteur. Students will actively investigate topics themselves, and conduct presentations and seminars under the guidance of the lecturer. Classes will be divided between tutorial sessions and sessions devoted to screenings, demonstrations, and presentations, plus self-directed off-site visits to relevant events and exhibitions.

In Lab II students develop and execute a small group project utilizing the key skills they are focusing on in their streams, or alternatively, act as a crew-member on a project being undertaken by more senior students in Studio I and II. Individuals and teams are required to log required hours in the lab environment, and to meet weekly with an assigned project supervisor who will act as a mentor and support person. A range of creative briefs will be provided for those originating their own project, covering potential projects in areas such as art and design, modelling, animation, game development, or hybrids of these. In addition to the creative work, students will be guided through planning, documenting, reporting, and reflecting on their work. Additional workshops may be provided where required to extend technical knowledge. Finished projects will form the basis of a portfolio to be built upon in successive trimesters.

* indicates elective stream unit (2D Animation Stream)

2D Animation III builds on the previous units, taking the student’s 2D skills to a sophisticated level of expressive and acting animation. Contemporary digital implementations of classical frame by frame animation styles are employed, with a strong emphasis on movement, timing, acting, and dialogue. Art cleanup methods and approaches are explored, giving the student experience in producing polished, finished 2D animation in a range of styles.

* indicates elective stream unit (3D Animation Stream)

This unit continues to develop core principles of animation while also introducing more sophisticated acting elements and dialogue via theory, and practice. The assessment tasks encourage students to animate their own ideas, characters and stories, adding individual personality and style in the process.

* indicates elective stream unit (Production Art Stream)

This third unit in the Production Art sequence consolidates the skills learnt in PAI and PAII and embeds them into the context of the full design of a production in animation, games, or a related field. Students will be introduced to the process and art of world creation, employing colour, form, composition, character, architecture, landscape, technology and culture to conceive, define, and illustrate narrative and experiential works. Illustration techniques and detailed documentation will also be key elements of the unit.

* indicates elective stream unit (CG Art Stream)


Introduction to using digital sculpture package for modelling and detailing. Through the unit students must maintain a focused and sustained sculpture practice, posting sculpts, duration of sculpt and reference to the course forum. Initially, this is to establish familiarity with software, analyzing planes and volume, and learning landmarks for the human figure. This includes gathering reference and analysing sculptures on an exhibition tour. The course then requires work for two subjects, stylised props and stylised character, including the preparation of models and textures, applicable to production project.

* indicates elective stream unit (Game Development Stream)

This unit extends the student’s fundamental knowledge of game programming through the practical application of the rapid prototyping process. The unit develops the approach needed when approaching game programming projects by engaging in a number of exercises that will explore the mindset required when thinking about the world in terms of systems and interconnected relationships and meanings.

In this unit students will be exposed to a range of theoretical frameworks derived from literary, film, animation and game studies. Students will explore a number of these through academic research, and share their discoveries with their peers in a tutorial presentation context. A flexible approach to the presentation of ideas through various media options will allow students to develop their thinking in visual and auditory ways as well as more traditional writing forms, and the group will be encouraged to engage in debate and discussion around the themes.

†indicates extension elective

Extended reality systems are a significant element of new trends in digital human interfaces and creative expression. This unit provides a foundational introduction to the history of XR technologies, their convergence in present systems, and key psychological elements informing a user experience. The first project implementing a basic augmentation application for mobile device introduces students to working with development plugins and principles of tracking key to all XR technologies. The second project extends students implementing development within a dedicated virtual reality system as a small team.

†indicates extension elective

Digital compositing is the process of combining visual elements into cohesive still and moving images and is integral for any post-production facility. Students are introduced to key areas in compositing, moving from separating and combining still images, to working with complex transparency, camera movement and computer-generated images. These scaffolded weekly projects prepare students for a proposal and project completed in a para-professional studio environment.

†indicates extension elective

This subject covers the capture, cleanup, and refinement of motion data acquired from our motion capture suite, but there should be an opportunity to explore the application of the tools in a slightly more experimental manner.

In Studio I and Studio II students will design and develop a short production completed to a professional/publishable standard. The design and prototyping stage of the project is undertaken in Studio 1. Students will be expected to develop and document a concept for a project and a project plan for the development and production of the full project (including Studio II) culminating in an exhibition of the completed work. They will work with their peers and mentors to develop required advanced technical skills and to regularly critique and refine their creative and technical goals. AGA 402 students, in consultation with the unit coordinator, may also involve students in AGA 304 to assist in the development of this project. At the end of this unit, students will need to have developed detailed creative and technical documentation and prototype elements that will allow full production to commence immediately in Studio 2.

This subject is aimed at giving you the tools and skills needed to seek employment upon completion of the program. Preparation of showreels and portfolios, letter writing and interview skills, and the promotion of oneself as a unique “brand” in a creative industry all form part of the content. You will have the opportunity to test your presentation skills in both mock and real environments. You will draw on the work completed during the course as well as charting a direction for the future, and preparing a set of materials to take with them into their job-seeking. You may, as a part of this unit, have the opportunity to connect with industry representatives at site visits, “speed-dating’ interviews, and other events.

Studio II is a continuation of Studio I. In this unit, students will finalise their project to a professional/publishable standard. Students will work with their peers and mentors to develop and apply advanced technical skills to expedite the creative realisation of their project. To more accurately simulate professional practice, students will be required to engage with peers in other disciplines or external practitioners for sound production, acting/voiceovers and so on, as required. AGA 404 students, in consultation with the unit coordinator, may also involve students in AGA 304 to assist in the development of this project. At the end of this unit, students will exhibit their completed project.

by application only

This unit provides you with an opportunity to ‘learn by doing’, and just as importantly to reflect upon your ‘doing’ in relation to achieving the unit’s learning outcomes. To guide your expectations of this unit, JMC Academy use the National Society for Experiential Education’s definition of internship, which is ‘a carefully monitored work or volunteer experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what he or she is learning throughout the experience’. You, your host employer and JMC Academy, will agree on a plan of work that meets your professional goals and the requirements of the unit. You will undertake that work in the workplace, under supervision from JMC Academy and your host employer’s nominated workplace supervisor. You are participating in this unit because you have made a successful application, and an internship opportunity is available to you. You will work with your campus’ internship/unit coordinator to make all the arrangements for your internship, as well as completing all necessary paperwork. JMC Academy will work with you to make your internship a success, including being as flexible as possible with regard to how, when and where you ‘intern’. Your internship/unit coordinator will be in regular contact with you, and you too must make an effort to contact them if you have any concerns or questions. In any case, you must successfully complete all assessment tasks to pass this unit.

Student Showcase

Our Lecturers

Peter Botev

Animation & Game Design Lecturer

Peter is a 2D animator, rigger and supervisor, working for studios across Australia and the EU. Notable credits include 20th Century’s Bob’s Burgers: The Movie, Netflix’s The Cuphead Show, Warner Bros' Jellystone, Nickelodeon’s Rise of the TMNT and Disney XD’s Space Chickens in Space

Peter Botev

Animation & Game Design Lecturer

Peter is a 2D animator, rigger and supervisor, working for studios across Australia and the EU. Notable credits include 20th Century’s Bob’s Burgers: The Movie, Netflix’s The Cuphead Show, Warner Bros' Jellystone, Nickelodeon’s Rise of the TMNT and Disney XD’s Space Chickens in Space

Tim McEwen

Animation, Game + Design Lecturer

Tim McEwen draws on his broad experience in feature film storyboards and concept art (Happy Feet Two, Blinky Bill, Wolf Creek 2), as well as comic books, illustration and cartooning. He's also an art director and graphic designer with 25+ years experience. He’s taught at all levels of education, including preschool, primary and secondary school, privately and in workshops, as well university and tertiary colleges.

Tim's been published professionally since he was 17, and his internationally distributed, award winning comic series ‘Greener Pastures’ has featured in nine exhibitions nationally and internationally. He continues to work in his chosen professions.

Tim McEwen

Animation, Game + Design Lecturer

Tim McEwen draws on his broad experience in feature film storyboards and concept art (Happy Feet Two, Blinky Bill, Wolf Creek 2), as well as comic books, illustration and cartooning. He's also an art director and graphic designer with 25+ years experience. He’s taught at all levels of education, including preschool, primary and secondary school, privately and in workshops, as well university and tertiary colleges.

Tim's been published professionally since he was 17, and his internationally distributed, award winning comic series ‘Greener Pastures’ has featured in nine exhibitions nationally and internationally. He continues to work in his chosen professions.

Sean Callinan

Head of Animation + Game Design (Sydney)

The essence of Sean’s career has been a broad-ranging interest in all aspects of design for film, television and other screen media. His career prior to teaching spans a wealth of experience, beginning as co-founder of his own production company, Meaningful Eye Contact (MEC), with Alex Proyas and Peter Miller. Sean quickly garnered a reputation for eye-catching visuals and inventive concepts. While producing music video clips for high profile acts such as INXS, Crowded House, and Fleetwood Mac, Sean developed a passion for the disciplines of production design, art direction, graphics and animation that would become instrumental in his future career.

During this period Sean received an AFI nomination for “Best Art Direction” for his work on Alex Proyas’ post-apocalyptic gothic fantasy feature Spirits of the Air, Gremlins of the Clouds. MEC were also the recipients of a number of music video awards through the eighties.

Having turned freelance, Sean continued to work on numerous television commercials, music videos, television productions and several more feature films. Animation and motion graphics had always been an important part of his practice, but in 2001 Sean made the decision to leave Production Design and focus on these areas whilst undertaking a Masters in Design at UTS.

Since then he has undertaken a range of work including infographic animation, screen graphics, museum interactives, collaborations on broadband and mobile platform content, and personal projects. Prior to accepting the role as Head of Animation and Game Development at JMC Academy, Sean taught animation, video design and screen-based media at UTS for over twenty years.

Sean Callinan

Head of Animation + Game Design (Sydney)

The essence of Sean’s career has been a broad-ranging interest in all aspects of design for film, television and other screen media. His career prior to teaching spans a wealth of experience, beginning as co-founder of his own production company, Meaningful Eye Contact (MEC), with Alex Proyas and Peter Miller. Sean quickly garnered a reputation for eye-catching visuals and inventive concepts. While producing music video clips for high profile acts such as INXS, Crowded House, and Fleetwood Mac, Sean developed a passion for the disciplines of production design, art direction, graphics and animation that would become instrumental in his future career.

During this period Sean received an AFI nomination for “Best Art Direction” for his work on Alex Proyas’ post-apocalyptic gothic fantasy feature Spirits of the Air, Gremlins of the Clouds. MEC were also the recipients of a number of music video awards through the eighties.

Having turned freelance, Sean continued to work on numerous television commercials, music videos, television productions and several more feature films. Animation and motion graphics had always been an important part of his practice, but in 2001 Sean made the decision to leave Production Design and focus on these areas whilst undertaking a Masters in Design at UTS.

Since then he has undertaken a range of work including infographic animation, screen graphics, museum interactives, collaborations on broadband and mobile platform content, and personal projects. Prior to accepting the role as Head of Animation and Game Development at JMC Academy, Sean taught animation, video design and screen-based media at UTS for over twenty years.

Lance Balchin

Head of Animation & Game Design (Brisbane)

Lance is an educator in the creative industries, with over 15 years hands-on experience teaching Photoshop. Lance’s relationship with Photoshop started in 1991 with Version 2.5 (pre layers!) and he has built a substantial understanding of the software over 25 years. Lance currently lives in Brisbane, Australia and was admitted to practice law two years ago.

Lance Balchin is also a children’s illustrator and author who has internationally published two books in the ‘Mechanica’ series with the Five Mile Press, Simon & Schuster, Little Bee Books and Bonnier Publishing. There are a further seven picture books to follow as well as a set of four novels. The books carry a strong environmental message and are written for children aged from 8 to 14.

Lance Balchin

Head of Animation & Game Design (Brisbane)

Lance is an educator in the creative industries, with over 15 years hands-on experience teaching Photoshop. Lance’s relationship with Photoshop started in 1991 with Version 2.5 (pre layers!) and he has built a substantial understanding of the software over 25 years. Lance currently lives in Brisbane, Australia and was admitted to practice law two years ago.

Lance Balchin is also a children’s illustrator and author who has internationally published two books in the ‘Mechanica’ series with the Five Mile Press, Simon & Schuster, Little Bee Books and Bonnier Publishing. There are a further seven picture books to follow as well as a set of four novels. The books carry a strong environmental message and are written for children aged from 8 to 14.

Kim Edwards

Head of Animation & Game Design (Melbourne)

Kim is a technologist, educator and animator with over a decade of experience working in media education.
From Sultans to Festivals, Health organisations to studios, he has maintained an active practice working with
a broad range of clients in animation. Kim believes animation and interactive media is a product, comment and forecaster of our global society.

Media dynamically shifts into new territories, requiring new perspectives and Kim sees the responsibility of education is to enable active creatives in this dynamic space.

Kim Edwards

Head of Animation & Game Design (Melbourne)

Kim is a technologist, educator and animator with over a decade of experience working in media education.
From Sultans to Festivals, Health organisations to studios, he has maintained an active practice working with
a broad range of clients in animation. Kim believes animation and interactive media is a product, comment and forecaster of our global society.

Media dynamically shifts into new territories, requiring new perspectives and Kim sees the responsibility of education is to enable active creatives in this dynamic space.

Dr Katharine Buljan

Animation Lecturer

Katharine Buljan is a Sydney-based artist, independent scholar and lecturer. She has exhibited her paintings in Australia, Italy, Hong Kong and Sweden and has received a number of awards. In 2016 she was been a finalist at the 39th Alice Prize and in 2015 a finalist at the Mosman Art Prize. In 2015 she was an artist in residence at the University of Tasmania (Launceston), and an artist in residence in Sydney (A. R. P. Artist Residency Program). In 2013, she was selected as a finalist for the 62nd Blake Prize for Religious Art. In 1995, Katharine was awarded a European Parchment at the XV Review of Contemporary Art in Galleria Forum Interart in Rome. She also does stop-motion animation.

Katharine’s theoretical training and research strongly underpin and complement her art practice. She is very passionate about teaching and was a sessional academic at the University of Technology, Sydney, and guest lecturer at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS). She is the co-author of the book on Japanese animation titled Anime, Religion and Spirituality: Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan (Equinox, 2015).

Dr Katharine Buljan

Animation Lecturer

Katharine Buljan is a Sydney-based artist, independent scholar and lecturer. She has exhibited her paintings in Australia, Italy, Hong Kong and Sweden and has received a number of awards. In 2016 she was been a finalist at the 39th Alice Prize and in 2015 a finalist at the Mosman Art Prize. In 2015 she was an artist in residence at the University of Tasmania (Launceston), and an artist in residence in Sydney (A. R. P. Artist Residency Program). In 2013, she was selected as a finalist for the 62nd Blake Prize for Religious Art. In 1995, Katharine was awarded a European Parchment at the XV Review of Contemporary Art in Galleria Forum Interart in Rome. She also does stop-motion animation.

Katharine’s theoretical training and research strongly underpin and complement her art practice. She is very passionate about teaching and was a sessional academic at the University of Technology, Sydney, and guest lecturer at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS). She is the co-author of the book on Japanese animation titled Anime, Religion and Spirituality: Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan (Equinox, 2015).

JMC gave me the opportunity to meet like-minded people and grow as a creative. The lecturers are fantastic! Their passion for the industry was infectious making me strive for my best
Rachael Tannous - VFX Supervisor, Sony Pictures
Animation Alumni
The selection of lecturers who were industry-based and able to impart a lot of impressive knowledge allowed me to get a foothold within the entertainment industry.
Mitchell Pasquini - Senior Character Rigger, Kapow Pictures
Animation Alumni
My favourite aspect of the degree was engaging with industry professionals. Picking the brains of the JMC lecturers who have broad and relevant experience.
Thomas Fisher - Digital Resources Administrator, Animal Logic
Animation Alumni

ARE YOU READY TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP TOWARD YOUR CAREER IN ANIMATION?

FAQs

Yes. We offer multiple pathways into the course regardless of your current drawing abilities and art is one of these pathways. If you don’t feel all too comfortable drawing, we offer pathways in technical and conceptual skills.

A portfolio essentially relates to samples of your work. If you have nice finished artwork, that’s fantastic, but not essential. What we’re looking for is that you have a drive to create things and are passionate about the field, so show us that in your portfolio. Things like sketches or drawings, notes, ideas and characters you’ve invented are all great.

Building your network with like-minded people and meeting people in the industry is really important. We encourage you to attend industry talks and events (many of which are held on campus) and introduce yourself to people. Amazing opportunities often arise through those connections so be open to new experiences. Create your own opportunities as well. If there’s nothing else happening, keep working. Work on your own projects and set yourself tasks to enhance and refine your skills so you not only have great content to add to your showreel, but when an opportunity does come up, you’re ready to seize it.

In the course of completing the Bachelor degree you will complete multiple key creative projects, both solo and in teams, as well as a host of smaller exercises. You will build your portfolio with polished work from your second trimester onwards and your last two trimesters will be devoted to a major project that will showcase your talent and abilities.

Yes. The JMC Academy is registered and regulated by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) which is Australia’s independent national regulator of the higher education sector, both public and private.

No, our courses are hands on and practical. Students are required to attend classes to receive ongoing mentorship, learn new skills and work with the equipment provided. We do encourage our students to use online study resources, however our courses would not be as immersive as they are without the practical component.