Duration
2 years (6 trimesters) accelerated
Locations
Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane
Fees
Intake Dates

February, June, September

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International

CRICOS 075773A

JMC welcomes from all over the world.
Find out more

Game Design at JMC provides the skills and knowledge to create fully immersive digital environments. Learn how to design, develop and implement an idea, with emphasis on creativity and expression through concept creation, digital drawing, environment modelling and game-engine implementation.

The video game industry is growing fast. The expertise and practices of game design + development is spilling over into a range of sectors, with design and development practices becoming widely adopted outside of purely gaming purposes.

Combine interactivity, game design and programming with traditional art practice and animation with a Bachelor of Creative Arts (Game Design). Focus in what you are passionate about as you select from a list of primary and secondary streams to hone in on your skills. 

Add to your Game Design primary stream with a choice of 2D Animation, 3D animation, CG (Computer Generated) Art or Production Art for the opportunity to combine both technical knowledge and artistic practice as you build a professional portfolio. Immerse yourself in an exciting journey from concept to finished product through the magic of visual storytelling.

Why Study Game Design at JMC?

Use the world's leading development platform for games and real-time content
Take advantage of our 18 camera dedicated motion capture suites
Study abroad in Tokyo and Osaka Japan, or the Netherlands

Technology & Facilities

We take gaming seriously at JMC, with each campus housing dedicated digital art + development studios with purpose built workstations, cintiq and intuos pro wacom tablets, non-digital art studio for prototyping, stopmotion, sculpting and life drawings, portable VR development suites, motion capture studios, Rokoko motion capture suits, 3D printers, green-screen cyclorama studio and mixing + recording studios.

JMC uses a range of software including Unity Game Engine, Autodesk Maya, Adobe Creative Cloud, Pixologic Zbrush, Substance Suite, Foundry Suite with Nuke + Mari, Redshift GPU + Arnold CPU Renderer, Adobe Suite, Toon Boom Harmony with Unity middleware, Shotgun Studio and SourceTree.

Duration

In just 2 years you can graduate with a Bachelor degree thanks to our accelerated full-time course. Part-time study is also available to domestic students. International students may choose to complete the course in 3 years [CRICOS 075772B] rather than the accelerated 2 year option.

Students who have successfully completed 4 trimesters of the Bachelor programme may successfully graduate with an Associate Degree qualification.

The Dutch Exchange

Take your passion to Europe and spend an entire trimester at Fontys Academy for Creative Industries in the Netherlands. Collaborate with creative students from all over the world and build your international contacts along the way.

Japan Study Tour

Spend 12 days immersed in anime and manga creation classes at the Tokyo Design Technology Center and Osaka Animation College, and explore the pop culture of Japan. This selective unit includes visits to the Osamu Tezuka Manga Museum and the Kyoto International Manga Museum.

CURRICULUM

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

This unit introduces students to practices, processes, and tools utilised in animation, games, and visual effects (VFX). Students will work through a series of self-contained exercises, with mentoring support from lecturers, which will provide entry-level practical experience. These will primarily be completed during class time. Areas of focus may include design research, design sketching and visualisation, concept ideation, simple animation, colour grading, editing, and delivery to different platforms. While students are not expected to achieve full competence in these skills, they will gain a practical grasp of the steps and thinking required to produce animation, games, and VFX. At the conclusion of this unit students will be supported to make an informed decision regarding the focus streams they will choose in Trimester 2.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

This unit introduces the student to the fundamental production process of creating art assets for games, teaching practical skills in operating a range of 2D and 3D content creation applications for the specific purpose of use in video games. Alongside creation methodologies and game-specific development pipelines students will learn about requirements and challenges unique to creating art assets for video games (optimization, functionality, etc.). Students will undertake a series of practice-based projects in developing various game art components of their own design.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

This unit introduces students to practices, processes, and tools utilised in animation, games, and visual effects (VFX). Students will work through a series of self-contained exercises, with mentoring support from lecturers, which will provide entry-level practical experience. These will primarily be completed during class time. Areas of focus may include 3D modelling, surfacing, texturing, basic rigging, simple animation, rendering, game mechanics, simple programming, and delivery to different platforms. While students are not expected to achieve full competence in these skills, they will gain a practical grasp of the steps and thinking required to produce animation, games, and VFX. At the conclusion of this unit students will be supported to make an informed decision regarding the focus streams they will choose in Trimester 2.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

In Lab I students are presented with the opportunity to develop and execute a small individual project utilising the key skills they are focusing on in their streams. They must log required hours in the lab environment and meet weekly with an assigned project supervisor who will act as a mentor and support person. A range of creative briefs will be provided covering potential projects in areas such as art and design, modelling, animation, game development, or hybrids of these. In addition to the creative work, students will be guided through planning, documenting, reporting, and reflecting on their work. Additional workshops may be provided where required to extend technical knowledge. Finished projects will form the basis of a portfolio to be built upon in successive trimesters.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

Games and Animation in Context provides students with a formal and contextual framework to discuss games and animation. Beginning with industry-focussed and practice-oriented material, students will develop towards a more critical understanding of their industry and the works that it produces. Students will gain language and concepts that will permit them to analyse and critique work in meaningful ways and to articulate their discoveries. This unit also requires on and off-campus participation in contemporary exhibitions, screenings, and events.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

2D Animation I - AGA204

Students are introduced to the conventions and common principles that have developed over animation’s rich hundred-year history. Students will explore traditional frame-by-frame techniques including cut-out, and drawn animation underpinning and developing an understanding of principles of movement and the animation process. Work will be undertaken using digital animation software and practices.

3D Animation I - AGA205

3D Animation I guides students through the analysis and application of key principles of animation in a 3D context at a basic level. Technical workflow and animation mechanics are illustrated through lectures, and ongoing practical exercises build foundational knowledge and skills. This is a practice led class with weekly exercises.

Game Dev I: Game Development - AGA206

This unit provides a broad introduction to working within game editor systems, integrating art elements into projects. The use of 2D & 3D graphics programs will be developed in conjunction with 2D & 3D features in the engine.  Students will be provided with a template for gameplay and will apply principles of design and technical art skills to develop a playable project. This will provide an overview of a range of core engine features and practical experience integrating content.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

This unit explores the foundations of good visual design. Students will learn the different elements and principles of visual communication including Gestalt, colour theory, layout and typography. They will explore how to bring these components together to create strong visual messages.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

Production Art I: Characters - AGA207

Character Design introduces key design principles for the creation of memorable animation and game characters in a range of styles. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of form and construction, the basics of anatomy and gesture through life drawing, and the visual development of characters from story contexts. Artwork workflow and finishing styles will be covered, along with unified approaches to developing a full cast. Industry practice in documentation and presentation will also be covered.

CG Art I: Modelling - AGA208

The unit focuses on general 3D art creation with an emphasis on process. Block-outs, low poly modelling in 3D, mesh optimisation, unwrapping, rendering to texture, texturing, and project management, are all covered using a low poly diorama as a vehicle for the project. The final project is uploaded to an online real-time WebGL 3D viewer.

The course begins with an introduction to the pipeline through the creation of simple prop objects such as telephone poles and signs. A scene block-out is then created and students work through the elements. For houses, a modular texturing approach is introduced along with stencils to reduce the number of textures. Finally, vegetation is created. Post-processing effects and lighting are added in the online viewer.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

This unit exposes the student to a history of animation and games embedded into a broader notion of the visual narrative or experience. Studies will lead from early examples of sequential art through to current examples of new technology platforms, with attention paid to historical and social context, geographical and technical factors, and the interplay of commercial production with the artist and auteur. Students will actively investigate topics themselves, and conduct presentations and seminars under the guidance of the lecturer. Classes will be divided between tutorial sessions and sessions devoted to screenings, demonstrations, and presentations, plus self-directed off-site visits to relevant events and exhibitions.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

This unit builds on the knowledge of game design and interactive storytelling that has been developed in the course to date. The subject introduces students to some of the fundamental theory of designing game spaces that are engaging to play in, developing a conceptual and theoretical foundation for the student to define and achieve game design goals. 

Content will include concepts universal to level design, including interactivity, map design, world building, immersion, sensory perception, and pace.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

This unit will provide practical knowledge of digital and non-digital game design. It will explore the requirements for a successful game, and the types of interactions used to create meaningful play. Theoretical analysis of existing game mechanics will be covered alongside contemporary design issues forming a conceptual framework to engage design-based practice with. Through paper prototyping, playtesting, iteration and analysis, students develop a range of design skills that are then demonstrated via a series of design challenges. Skills gained in this unit are implemented in future units as part of the game creation process.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

In Lab II students develop and execute a small group project utilizing the key skills they are focusing on in their streams, or alternatively, act as a crew-member on a project being undertaken by more senior students in Studio I and II. Individuals and teams are required to log required hours in the lab environment, and to meet weekly with an assigned project supervisor who will act as a mentor and support person. A range of creative briefs will be provided for those originating their own project, covering potential projects in areas such as art and design, modelling, animation, game development, or hybrids of these. In addition to the creative work, students will be guided through planning, documenting, reporting, and reflecting on their work. Additional workshops may be provided where required to extend technical knowledge. Finished projects will form the basis of a portfolio to be built upon in successive trimesters.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

Depending on your chosen stream:

2D Animation II - AGA305

2D Animation II gives students a deeper understanding of digital animation packages, by looking at more advanced functionality, rigging, and background animation techniques. Students will also explore 2D animation for games and develop and import those animations into a game engine.

3D Animation II: Rigging - AGA306

This unit covers how to set up a skeleton and rig for a character mesh, how to skin the mesh and weight it properly, how to add controls to the rig, user interface options, blend shapes, and testing of rigs. The unit provides the technical knowledge required for creating a fully controllable character for use in animation or game productions. Rigging is often sought as a secondary skill for animators and an understanding of rigging allows animators to exercise greater creative control over the character rigs they work with.

Game Dev II: Programming - AGA307

Creating effective and tightly designed game prototypes is made possible only with an understanding of fundamental core programming concepts. This unit introduces game programming and game engine operation, by writing games-focused software scripts in the C# language using the Unity game engine Application Programming Interface (API). Students will complete a number of small games exercises and develop their own small coding project in an area of interest, learning the fundamentals of programming for game design practitioners of all fields – artists, designers, and programmers.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

Depending on your chosen stream:

2D Animation III - AGA310

2D Animation III builds on the previous units, taking the student’s 2D skills to a sophisticated level of expressive and acting animation. Contemporary digital implementations of classical frame by frame animation styles are employed, with a strong emphasis on movement, timing, acting, and dialogue. Art clean-up methods and approaches are explored, giving the student experience in producing polished, finished 2D animation in a range of styles.

3D Animation III - AGA311

This unit continues to develop core principles of animation while also introducing more sophisticated acting elements and dialogue via theory, and practice. The assessment tasks encourage students to animate their own ideas, characters and stories, adding individual personality and style in the process.

AGA312 Game Dev III: Rapid Prototyping - AGA312

This unit extends the student’s fundamental knowledge of game programming through the practical application of the rapid prototyping process. The unit develops the approach needed when approaching game programming projects by engaging in a number of exercises that will explore the mindset required when thinking about the world in terms of systems and interconnected relationships and meanings.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

Production Art II: Prop & Environment Design - AGA308

This unit focuses on design and drawing skills for the creation of three-dimensional props, vehicles, buildings and environments. There is a strong emphasis on perspective and volumetric drawing, accurate portrayal of physical detail and form, and the composition and layout of spaces. Drafting and rendering techniques and conventions are covered, as well as style and finish for concept art and production design.

CG Art II: Digital Sculpture - AGA317

Introduction to using digital sculpture package for modelling and detailing. Through the unit students must maintain a focussed and sustained sculpture practice, posting sculpts, duration of sculpt and reference to the course forum. Initially, this is to establish familiarity with software, analysing planes and volume, and learning landmarks for the human figure. This includes gathering reference and analysing sculptures on an exhibition tour. The course then requires work for two subjects, stylised props and stylised character, including the preparation of models and textures, applicable to production project.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

Production Art III: Production Design - AGA313

This third unit in the Production Art sequence consolidates the skills learnt in PAI and PAII and embeds them into the context of the full design of a production in animation, games, or a related field. Students will be introduced to the process and art of world creation, employing colour, form, composition, character, architecture, landscape, technology and culture to conceive, define, and illustrate narrative and experiential works. Illustration techniques and detailed documentation will also be key elements of the unit.

CG Art III: Look Development - AGA318

This unit focuses on look development via surfacing, lighting, and rendering, and introduces software for use in creating textures. Students are introduced to creative and technical lighting approaches and systems in greater depth. Common materials and channels contextualising their use are explored. Texturing approaches inside specialist software are introduced with a focus on developing layered, matte based approaches for further customisation in a destination application. Procedural and semi-automated systems for look development will also be explored. Rendering strategies will be explored and the calculation of render times for quality output is examined.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 6

Industry Development provides students with guidance in the preparation of their professional profile, seeking employment, additional study, or the development of personal career goals. Students will build an awareness of career pathways, salary structures, local and international industries, and advancement. They will be supported technically and creatively in the creation of promotional materials such as Resumes, CVs, show reels, portfolios, and the like, and the investigation of their industry and available career paths. Professional and workplace skills are addressed with a strong emphasis on good communication practice, and the maintenance of good mental health and wellbeing. The unit may involve guest lectures from practitioners or studio visits, as well as attendance at industry events and presentations.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 5

In this unit students will be exposed to a range of theoretical frameworks derived from literary, film, animation and game studies. Students will explore a number of these through academic research, and share their discoveries with their peers in a tutorial presentation context. A flexible approach to the presentation of ideas through various media options will allow students to develop their thinking in visual and auditory ways as well as more traditional writing forms, and the group will be encouraged to engage in debate and discussion around the themes.

Credit Points: 18
Trimester 6

Studio II is a continuation of Studio I. In this unit, students will finalise their project to a professional/publishable standard. Students will work with their peers and mentors to develop and apply advanced technical skills to expedite the creative realisation of their project. To more accurately simulate professional practice, students will be required to engage with peers in other disciplines or external practitioners for sound production, acting/voiceovers and so on, as required. AGA 404 students, in consultation with the unit coordinator, may also involve students in AGA 304 to assist in the development of this project. At the end of this unit, students will exhibit their completed project.

Credit Points: 12
Trimester 5

In Studio I and Studio II students will design and develop a short production completed to a professional/publishable standard. The design and prototyping stage of the project is undertaken in Studio 1, along with the early stages of production. Students will be expected to develop and document a concept for a project and a project plan for the development and production of the full project (including Studio II), or to contribute as a specialist to one or more of these projects, culminating in an exhibition of the completed works. They will work with their peers and mentors to develop required advanced technical skills and to regularly critique and refine their creative and technical goals. AGA 402 students, in consultation with the unit coordinator, may also involve students in AGA 304 to assist in the development of this project. At the end of this unit, students will need to have developed detailed creative and technical documentation and prototype elements and begun full production which will then be carried over into Studio 2.

Digital compositing is the process of combining visual elements into cohesive still and moving images and is integral for any post-production facility. Students are introduced to key areas in compositing, moving from separating and combining still images, to working with complex transparency, camera movement and computer-generated images.  These scaffolded weekly projects prepare students for a proposal and project completed in a para-professional studio environment.

Extended reality systems are a significant element of new trends in digital human interfaces and creative expression. This unit provides a foundational introduction to the history of XR technologies, their convergence in present systems, and key psychological elements informing a user experience.

The first project implementing a basic augmentation application for mobile device introduces students to working with development plugins and principles of tracking key to all XR technologies. The second project extends students implementing development within a dedicated virtual reality system as a small team.

Motion capture systems are an increasingly important tool in the creation of film and game animation, but to produce high-quality work requires knowledge and skill. This unit will introduce students to the technology and techniques for designing, setting-up, capturing and working with motion capture data.

Students will examine examples of motion capture work good and bad, and analyse where and how it is most effective. You will work with actors or other performers in the studio, to direct performance and motion for capture. You will learn how to set up and use the equipment and how to acquire and manage the data produced.

Most importantly students will spend a substantial part of the unit developing an understanding of how the data is utilised, and the place of the animator’s skillset in refining, cleaning up and completing the action captured. You will begin to acquire these skills through the practical work undertaken in the unit.

(by application only)

COL401 Internship aims to provide students with an internship opportunity that has sound educational value and provides students the chance to initiate and/or develop relationships with professionals in their discipline. COL401 allows students to prepare or consolidate their know-how to work as a professional and increase their technical and creative skills base. It also allows students to explore potential areas of employment. 

In this unit the National Society for Experiential Education’s definition of “internship” is used. This is internship is a carefully monitored volunteering or working experience where an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what they are learning throughout the experience. For this reason, beside the time students spend during their internship, they will also spend self-study time. They will reflect upon their awareness of applying theory to practice during their internship, practicing their ability to evaluate situations, critical thinking, and effective communication of their decision-making. 

Students will also elaborate a professional plan where they explain their aspiring professional development goals and the activities that would assist them to achieve these under the guidance of their Internship Coordinator/Supervisor.  

(by application only)

This subject is a special project based on research, experiences and learning undertaken in conjunction with the overseas academic partners and JMC Academy.  Students will be immersed in two weeks of educational experiences prior to JMC Academy trimester start, hosted by the overseas academic partners. They will cover a range of topics, skills and knowledge taught by industry experts and educators in the students’ area of study (Entertainment Business Management, Music, Design, Film and Television, Audio Engineering, Animation and Game Design). 

On completion of the two weeks of study, students will continue with a 12 week special project on campus at JMC Academy in Australia. 

Individual projects are based on a specific project topic of the student’s choice made in consultation with their term supervisor. That is then developed over the length of the subject. Students will be supervised and will work in conjunction with their supervisor to complete their project (Academic or Practical).



Our Lecturers

Sean Callinan

Head of Animation + Game Design (Sydney)

The essence of Sean’s career has been a broad-ranging interest in all aspects of design for film, television and other screen media. His career prior to teaching spans a wealth of experience, beginning as co-founder of his own production company, Meaningful Eye Contact (MEC), with Alex Proyas and Peter Miller. Sean quickly garnered a reputation for eye-catching visuals and inventive concepts. While producing music video clips for high profile acts such as INXS, Crowded House, and Fleetwood Mac, Sean developed a passion for the disciplines of production design, art direction, graphics and animation that would become instrumental in his future career.

During this period Sean received an AFI nomination for “Best Art Direction” for his work on Alex Proyas’ post-apocalyptic gothic fantasy feature Spirits of the Air, Gremlins of the Clouds. MEC were also the recipients of a number of music video awards through the eighties.

Having turned freelance, Sean continued to work on numerous television commercials, music videos, television productions and several more feature films. Animation and motion graphics had always been an important part of his practice, but in 2001 Sean made the decision to leave Production Design and focus on these areas whilst undertaking a Masters in Design at UTS.

Since then he has undertaken a range of work including infographic animation, screen graphics, museum interactives, collaborations on broadband and mobile platform content, and personal projects. Prior to accepting the role as Head of Animation and Game Development at JMC Academy, Sean taught animation, video design and screen-based media at UTS for over twenty years.

Sean Callinan

Head of Animation + Game Design (Sydney)

The essence of Sean’s career has been a broad-ranging interest in all aspects of design for film, television and other screen media. His career prior to teaching spans a wealth of experience, beginning as co-founder of his own production company, Meaningful Eye Contact (MEC), with Alex Proyas and Peter Miller. Sean quickly garnered a reputation for eye-catching visuals and inventive concepts. While producing music video clips for high profile acts such as INXS, Crowded House, and Fleetwood Mac, Sean developed a passion for the disciplines of production design, art direction, graphics and animation that would become instrumental in his future career.

During this period Sean received an AFI nomination for “Best Art Direction” for his work on Alex Proyas’ post-apocalyptic gothic fantasy feature Spirits of the Air, Gremlins of the Clouds. MEC were also the recipients of a number of music video awards through the eighties.

Having turned freelance, Sean continued to work on numerous television commercials, music videos, television productions and several more feature films. Animation and motion graphics had always been an important part of his practice, but in 2001 Sean made the decision to leave Production Design and focus on these areas whilst undertaking a Masters in Design at UTS.

Since then he has undertaken a range of work including infographic animation, screen graphics, museum interactives, collaborations on broadband and mobile platform content, and personal projects. Prior to accepting the role as Head of Animation and Game Development at JMC Academy, Sean taught animation, video design and screen-based media at UTS for over twenty years.

Mark Dickie

Head of Animation and Game Design (Brisbane)

As a freelance computer graphics generalist, Mark has gained expansive experience working in animation, motion graphics and asset creation for games, television and the web. Outside of the classroom, he is involved in a number of independent games development projects.

While he has been involved in a number of exciting games and animation projects over the years, he feels privileged and most proud of being integrally involved in the development and roll out of JMC Academy’s cutting edge games and digital animation degrees.

Mark credits his success to his commitment to lifelong learning, continued engagement in his artistic medium and collaboration with other highly talented creative practitioners. In turn, these are all attributes he nurtures in his students to help them build their creative future as the next generation of Gamers and Animators.

Mark Dickie

Head of Animation and Game Design (Brisbane)

As a freelance computer graphics generalist, Mark has gained expansive experience working in animation, motion graphics and asset creation for games, television and the web. Outside of the classroom, he is involved in a number of independent games development projects.

While he has been involved in a number of exciting games and animation projects over the years, he feels privileged and most proud of being integrally involved in the development and roll out of JMC Academy’s cutting edge games and digital animation degrees.

Mark credits his success to his commitment to lifelong learning, continued engagement in his artistic medium and collaboration with other highly talented creative practitioners. In turn, these are all attributes he nurtures in his students to help them build their creative future as the next generation of Gamers and Animators.

Robyn Dixon

Head of Department for Animation & Games (Melbourne)

Robyn Dixon, the Head Lecturer for Animation and Game Design at JMC Academy in Melbourne, has an impressive background in the industry.

She previously held the position of Senior Lecturer for Animation at JMC Academy, showcasing her expertise and dedication to the field. Robyn's experience extends beyond academia; she was a UI Artist at Big Ant Studios, contributing to the visual aspects of gaming experiences. Her professional journey also includes working with notable clients such as the School Library Association of Victoria, Hardie Grant Egmont Publishing, Jetstar, Appster, Moose Toys, and Restless Socks, highlighting her versatility and wide-ranging skills. 

Robyn's return to JMC Academy reflects her ongoing passion for animation, games, ethical education, and leadership, all of which will undoubtedly contribute to the continued success and growth of the Animation and Game Design department.

Robyn Dixon

Head of Department for Animation & Games (Melbourne)

Robyn Dixon, the Head Lecturer for Animation and Game Design at JMC Academy in Melbourne, has an impressive background in the industry.

She previously held the position of Senior Lecturer for Animation at JMC Academy, showcasing her expertise and dedication to the field. Robyn's experience extends beyond academia; she was a UI Artist at Big Ant Studios, contributing to the visual aspects of gaming experiences. Her professional journey also includes working with notable clients such as the School Library Association of Victoria, Hardie Grant Egmont Publishing, Jetstar, Appster, Moose Toys, and Restless Socks, highlighting her versatility and wide-ranging skills. 

Robyn's return to JMC Academy reflects her ongoing passion for animation, games, ethical education, and leadership, all of which will undoubtedly contribute to the continued success and growth of the Animation and Game Design department.

Petr Joura

Senior Game Design Lecturer

Petr Joura

Senior Game Design Lecturer

Vannasouk Phadilok

Game Design Senior Lecturer

Vannasouk is a passionate game developer and educator with over a decade of experience. He has been involved with the project management and development of a wide range of published game titles. 

He is the co-founder of Gamesage, a private software development company.  This business continues to develop software and game development solutions for business around the world. 

Vannasouk is passionate about interactive entertainment, education and community; and has built a career striving to enrich each of these avenues.

Vannasouk Phadilok

Game Design Senior Lecturer

Vannasouk is a passionate game developer and educator with over a decade of experience. He has been involved with the project management and development of a wide range of published game titles. 

He is the co-founder of Gamesage, a private software development company.  This business continues to develop software and game development solutions for business around the world. 

Vannasouk is passionate about interactive entertainment, education and community; and has built a career striving to enrich each of these avenues.

Az Valastro

Animation and Game Design Lecturer

Az Valastro is a Game Developer and Artist, who previously studied Game Design at JMC Academy. They have a passion for all areas within both digital and tabletop game development. Outside of lecturing at JMC Academy, they develop and release card and digital games independently with their brother, through the business they run together. 

Az Valastro

Animation and Game Design Lecturer

Az Valastro is a Game Developer and Artist, who previously studied Game Design at JMC Academy. They have a passion for all areas within both digital and tabletop game development. Outside of lecturing at JMC Academy, they develop and release card and digital games independently with their brother, through the business they run together. 

Shaye Hayes

Senior Animation & Game Design Lecturer

Shaye Hayes is a creative lecturer in Game Design, Animation and Design. Outside of lecturing, Shaye is involved in games entertainment.

Shaye has also published a paper on the principles of immersion for virtual reality and is currently working on her master's degree.

Shaye Hayes

Senior Animation & Game Design Lecturer

Shaye Hayes is a creative lecturer in Game Design, Animation and Design. Outside of lecturing, Shaye is involved in games entertainment.

Shaye has also published a paper on the principles of immersion for virtual reality and is currently working on her master's degree.

Studying at JMC Academy was a great experience. It gave me the foundational knowledge, experience, and a solid support network to rely on when pursuing my dream career.
Okan Beyit - Environment Artist and Level Designer at Zero Latency
Game Design Alumni
Learning with industry standard software at JMC definitely prepared me for a career in the game industry. The small class sizes also made the lecturers very accessible and hands on.
Alaric Willi - Render Wrangler, Iloura Animation and Visual Effects Studio
Game Design Alumni
Work is not just 9 to 5 anymore. I am so thankful to be living and breathing my passion to make games.
Sofia Maraitis - Associate Experience Designer at EA Games
Game Design Alumni

Are you ready to take the next step toward your career in Game Design?

FAQs

Yes. We offer multiple pathways into the course regardless of your current drawing abilities and art is one of these pathways. If you don’t feel all too comfortable drawing, we offer pathways in technical and conceptual skills.

A portfolio essentially relates to samples of your work. If you have nice finished artwork, that’s fantastic, but not essential. What we’re looking for is that you have a drive to create things and are passionate about the field, so show us that in your portfolio. Things like sketches or drawings, notes, ideas and characters you’ve invented are all great.

It’s your compulsion to create, tell stories and discover new forms of play that we’re really looking for, and we teach the course from beginner level up so you’re in good hands.

The Game course is primarily focused on art and design, but we recognise that a familiarity with scripting and programming is a key part of the skillset of a game artist, and you will certainly learn skills in those areas as well.

The emphasis is on understanding the theory behind games, designing interesting challenges, mechanics, concepts and stories, and creating the art and assets for those concepts. You would be studying a mix of art and design, software and programming skills, and theoretical concepts.

Yes. The JMC Academy is registered and regulated by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) which is Australia’s independent national regulator of the higher education sector, both public and private.

No, our courses are hands on and practical. Students are required to attend classes to receive ongoing mentorship, learn new skills and work with the equipment provided. We do encourage our students to use online study resources, however our courses would not be as immersive as they are without the practical component.

While the availability of internships and work placements depends on the individual companies and studios in the industry, we have strong relationships with many practising game designers and game studios. As a result of these connections there is the potential for you to experience internships and placements, studio visits, talks and workshops by industry practitioners, and assessment feedback opportunities from industry people during dedicated 'speed networking' nights. Where practical, interviews will be arranged for individual graduating students with companies seeking to recruit new talent.

Applications used in the Game Design course include Maya for modelling and animation, MotionBuilder for motion capture, Substance Painter & Designer for texturing and ZBrush for digital sculpture.

Unity 3D will be your core game engine and you'll work with Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and After Effects. You will also have the chance to try a range of other packages such as Nuke, SourceTree & Foundry Mari.