Duration
2 years (6 trimesters) accelerated
Locations
Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Australia
Fees
Intake Dates

February, June, September

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International

CRICOS 081192E

JMC welcomes students from all over the world.
Find out more

Film + TV at JMC is a hands-on production-based course that will give you the knowledge and the creative, technical and managerial skills to create and produce leading content for film, TV, live broadcasts, documentaries, commercials and music videos.

At Bachelor level, work on a short film, a TV commercial, a music video and a large-scale outside broadcast to create your professional showreel and filmography. Develop your creative expression and technical skills whilst mastering screenwriting, directing, cinematography, motion graphics and post-production, to launch you into the heart of the industry.

Collaborate with JMC Academy’s Music Performance and Management students on a production piece, a music video for example, and study advanced production management, post-production and motion graphics.

Why Study Film & Television at JMC?

Use our huge range of cameras & equipment including RED EPICs and multi-cam studios
Intern with major production and post-production companies and broadcasters
Gain real-world experience working on major events, festivals, conferences, awards nights and more

Technology & Facilities

We take film and TV seriously at JMC, with studios full of the best tech in the trade. You’ll have access to highly sophisticated equipment and recording studios, including RED EPIC-W™ HELIUM™ 8K cameras, Sony FS 700s, green-screen studios, editing suites, colour grading equipment including powerful iMac Pros and Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve, classrooms fitted with 5.1 surround sound and full student loan facilities with lenses, cameras, lights and sound equipment available.

Duration

In only 2 years you can graduate with a Bachelor of Creative Arts (Film & Television) thanks to our accelerated full-time course (144 credit points). Part-time study is also available to domestic students. International students may choose to complete the course in 3 years [CRICOS 058461C] rather than the accelerated 2 year option.

LA Study Tour

For those after the US experience, take the 12-day trip to our partner film school in Los Angeles and immerse yourself in classes, theme park visits and private backlot and studio tours at the place RCA Records, Elvis and The Rolling Stones used to call home. This project-based experience will replace one-for-one credits in related units of study.

Fontys Academy for Creative Industries

JMC Academy offers the opportunity for students to spend one trimester abroad at Fontys University Academy for Creative Industries (ACI) in Tilburg, Netherlands. As part of the exchange, JMC Academy receives Fontys University ACI students in February each year.

The JMC exchange students study alongside others from around the world as they undertake subjects offered by the Fontys Academy for Creative Industries.Students receive subject credits that are the equivalent of one full trimester of study. All subjects are delivered in English at the Tilburg campus.

This opportunity is open to Entertainment Management, Animation, Game Design, Digital Design and Film and TV students who have completed at least two trimesters of study at JMC. Places are limited to three students per exchange. Study abroad grants may be available.

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CURRICULUM

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

The unit provides students with an insight into the role of the film, television and digital producer. An effective producer must possess excellent management, research, writing and verbal communication skills, and should have a sound knowledge of industry protocols, organisations and legislation. A combination of academic research and writing, and production paperwork exercises will equip students to select, develop, plan, schedule and effectively produce their JMC Academy student productions, and gain an introductory understanding of the Australian film and television industry along with the latest developments.

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

The purpose of this unit is to provide students with a foundation in the creative craft of writing for screen. Students will be required to write an original 5-7 minute (or 3 x 2 mins) script for a short film or a web series, and in so doing develop their knowledge and skills of narrative structure, character and plot development, of the relationship between dialogue and image, and of writing techniques appropriate to a specific genre.   

Class activities include creative workshops; script analyses; idea generation and evaluation; writing for different genres; using image, word and sound to develop plot and character; writing, refining, editing and proofing; table readings; and writing using industry-standard templates.  

Students are encouraged to use the script created in this unit as the basis for their Short Film production in FTP304 Production Project 3: Short Film.  

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

Whether the production is a drama, documentary or music video, a solid understanding of editing theory, techniques and styles – including continuity style editing and montage theory - will assist to develop the student’s storytelling skills and creativity in the edit suite. This unit provides students with both theoretical and practical knowledge of editing through a range of post-production practices. Students will engage with a range of software providing them with the opportunity to develop the fundamental skills they will require to edit and deliver practical productions. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

Sound is an important tool for conveying ideas, story and/or emotion. The skills and knowledge gained in this unit will prepare students for their screen productions at JMC Academy and beyond. The purpose of this unit is to explore sound, its properties, how it is captured and manipulated, and its relationship to the screen. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of sound and investigate the techniques necessary to record sound in the field or studio, using portable field mixers for film and television productions.   

To demonstrate their grasp of the fundamental principles of sound, students will be required to record sound in the studio and on location. Recordings will incorporate dialogue, background and pieces for their foley library.  

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

The art of storytelling in visual media is about more than a good script and great direction. Storytelling involves every aspect of production, including manipulating the relationship between camera and light. In this unit, students will develop their theoretical knowledge of the relationship between cinematography and lighting techniques, and then safely apply that knowledge to a range of different situations to intentionally create the desired visuals. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

The purpose of this unit is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of directing drama.  

These skills and knowledge of a dramaturg can be applied in a diverse range of genre, including short films, feature films, scripted TV shows, documentary, and reality television, TVC’s and Music Videos. The role of the Director as a ‘creative’ is explored in the context of communicating and working with actors and production personnel while maintaining a healthy and safe workplace. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 1

This unit is an introduction to the creative, technical, administrative, and managerial aspects of film and television production.  Students are required to gain fundamental skills in the operation of cameras, lighting, audio equipment and editing software, and engage with single camera and multi-camera processes.  This unit orientates the student to the physical production environment (both studio and location) and develops their essential technical skills for all future production projects. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 2

Documentaries (non-fiction films) hold an important place in contemporary media culture. They are often about how people can be connected to the world and help make sense of specific phenomena. Consequently, a documentary filmmaker has an obligation to consider the ethics of their practice, particularly the nature of their relationship with their subjects and their audience. Against this background, students are given the opportunity to explore the principles and techniques of documentary film making as they research, pitch, and produce their own 5—7 minutes documentary, as well as participate in the making of their peers’ work. 

This unit equips students with the skills and knowledge required to pitch and produce their own short documentary. There will be a range of in class activities to train the students in story development, research techniques, interviewing techniques, sound recording skills, documentary shooting, lighting techniques, and green screen compositing. Many of these skills and techniques will be utilised and then assessed in the final productions. Research, planning, and communication skills are crucial to documentary production and students will need to be prepared to crew on each other’s productions and interact with individuals and organisations outside of JMC Academy as their subjects. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

Short films are artistic products that can find festival and online audiences all over the world. They are also seen as a training ground and calling card for aspiring feature film or television drama producers, directors, and crew. Whilst producing a short film, students will work on specific crew roles on the production where they will need to be well organised, self-motivated, and professional. The final production will be a calling card, a proof of concept, an opportunity to close the gap between ambitions and abilities, and evidence that good stories come in all lengths.   

Through In class workshops, students will attain the skill set required to effectively plan and implement pre production, production and post production processes, as appropriate to the short film. Students will utilise research practices to ascertain creative and technical perspectives in the evaluation of short films, while being able to recognise and produce all the necessary paperwork that is associated with them.  

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906) was the first ever feature film made in the world, and the Australian film industry continues to make films that find local and global audiences, as well as garner critical acclaim. Consequently, the Pacific region is recognised as an exciting place for producing original and arresting content. This unit utilises research practices and provides students with the opportunity to develop a critical and broad appreciation and knowledge of Australian and New Zealand screen content (feature film, documentary, TV drama series, web series, etc.). Students can then apply this foundational knowledge to create new material and to enhance their abilities to secure future production work by introducing them to filmmakers and T.V. programme makers working within the Pacific.  

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 3

By its nature, making screen content is a team effort with multiple departments working together to advance the Director’s vision. Large-scale broadcast and feature film projects often require hundreds of crew, all with various skillsets that support and complement each other, in order to achieve this goal. These crew roles are often referred to as “below-the-line” and through the course of a career in the screen industry, it’s common for an individual to work in many below-the-line roles before they might eventually progress to being a Head of Department (e.g., Production Designer, Stunt Coordinator, Costume Designer, Key Grip, Assistant Director, Cinematographer, Editor, In the Production Roles and Services unit, we will explore a range of below-the-line crew roles, explaining their job and how they fit into the overall production through lectures and workshops.   

In particular, we will be covering the following: 

  • Production Office:  Production Assistant, Production Co-Ordinator & Runner 

  • Assistant Director - 1st AD, 2nd AD & 3rd AD 

  • Costume Designer 

  • Stunt Coordinator 

  • Armourer 

  • Intimacy Coordinator 

  • Assistant Camera & Camera Department:  Focus Puller, Data Wrangler 

  • Location Manager, Unit Manager, Safety & Traffic 

  • Continuity: Script Supervisor 

  • Casting:  Casting Assistant, Director 

  • Art Director & Art Department – Buyer, Dresser, Set Decorator, Assistant Coordinator, Props Assistant & Standby Props & Runner 

Some of these roles are entry-level, gateway positions for emerging filmmakers – and upon the successful completion of this unit, students will have gained the knowledge and experience to not only use these acquired skills in their own student productions, but also in industry positions after finishing their degree. 

Many of these skills and roles will assist students in their various productions as well as act as introductions to specialist units in later trimesters (e.g. Art Department → Designing for the Screen; Camera Department → Camera & Lighting 2 & Camera & Lighting 3: Advanced Cinematography, Production Office – Producing 2). 

Each week’s 3 hour class will be conducted by a specialist lecturer in the relevant field supported by the Head of Department, staff member or a contracted lecturer across the entire trimester. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 4

Understanding and responding to the continually transforming digital landscape is a fundamental qualification for any contemporary media content Producer. The role of a Digital Producer can vary considerably depending on the available technology platforms and whether you are working as a start-up, in-house, in a digital agency, as a freelance or for a SME or larger company.  Either way, the Digital Producer could find themselves producing video blogs, pop-up ads, social campaigns, podcasts, commercials, VR programmes and beyond.  This unit prepares students to be able to embrace all facets of Digital Producing – from understanding the evolving technical jargon and to be able to engage with other technical crew to create content for digital websites, social media, mobile applications, games, and interactive media. Students will learn how to supervise a digital project through conception, pitching, creative and technical development, scheduling, roll-out, media buy, analytics and beta-testing through to completion and delivery. 

Trimester 3

  • Camera & Lighting 2 FTP302
  • Camera & Lighting 3: Cinematography FTP319
  • Screenwriting 2 FTP307
  • Screenwriting 3: Long Form FTP408
  • Post Production 2 FTP303
  • Producing 2 - FTP401
  • Post Production 3 FTP405
  • Major Project: Post Production FTP426
  • Directing 2 FTP311
  • Major Project: Development FTP316
  • Music Video FTP310
  • Designing for The Screen FTP324
  • The Acting Foundation ACT201
  • Compositing AGA405 
  • Post Production Audio ASP413
  • Internship COL401
  • International Study Tour COL400
  • E-Portfolio COL402

Trimester 4

  • Camera & Lighting 2 FTP302
  • Camera & Lighting 3: Cinematography FTP319
  • Screenwriting 2 FTP307
  • Screenwriting 3: Long Form FTP408
  • Post Production 2 FTP303
  • Producing 2 - FTP401
  • Post Production 3 FTP405
  • Major Project: Post Production FTP426
  • Directing 2 FTP311
  • Major Project: Development FTP316
  • Music Video FTP310
  • Designing for The Screen FTP324
  • The Acting Foundation ACT201
  • Compositing AGA405 
  • Post Production Audio ASP413
  • Internship COL401
  • International Study Tour COL400
  • E-Portfolio COL402

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 5

An awareness of the history of film and television gives new screen practitioners contextual knowledge to understand current technologies and protocols and anticipate future trends. In this unit students will utilise research practises to survey major technological and cultural developments in the screen industry from the early days to contemporary cinema. Films will be formally analysed in terms of narrative, editing, mise-en-scène, shots, lighting, sound, and stylistically in terms of genre and authorship.  Different theoretical approaches to screen studies including aestheticism, discourse analysis and semiotics will be explored. The overall aim of this unit is to broaden students’ awareness of the artistic, cultural, political and economic contexts within which screen industries have developed and operated. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 6

This unit examines a range of non-Hollywood national cinemas and indie filmmaking from a global and transnational perspective. Key theoretical approaches to national and international cinemas are examined, along with significant historical, textual, representational, and ideological issues (for example, the key concepts of ‘other and same’). Students will also explore the significant differences between Hollywood mainstream productions and the critical challenges posed by local production, distribution and exhibition models, along with those faced by filmmakers within these different cultures. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 5

This unit follows on from Major Project:  Development, providing students with the opportunity to collaborate on several major projects. This unit sees the culmination of a creative vision come to fruition following pitches held at the end of the previous trimester. The focus is on pre-production and a range of meetings and productions scheduled across this trimester. All students will crew on each other’s productions – and contribute the appropriate preproduction planning, preparation and paperwork.  Each student will have a different trajectory of roles over the slate of productions – with a minimum of one major and one minor role; or three minor roles.  Production on each project is slated for up to 5 days. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 6

This unit serves as a bridge into the industry for students in their final study period at JMC Academy. Students will examine their ‘professional identity’ and how this relates to their motivation and career goals. Students will be required to use this time to further establish themselves as emerging professionals, exploring, and articulating their unique value and reproducing that in their portfolio. The goal of the portfolio will be to affirm the student’s place in the screen industry – at this point in time – and therefore must also include a showreel of work finished to industry standard. Depending on their goals, students will develop a strategic plan focussing on generating new and exploiting current opportunities, all the while taking care of their physical, mental and spiritual well-being. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 5

The purpose of this unit is to provide students with knowledge of the essential concepts and practical understanding of multi-camera broadcast operations, including the complexities of the digital video signal and emerging broadcast formats.  Students will gain a deeper insight into live production protocols using industry-standard broadcasting equipment. In addition, students will gain experience and understanding of the technical requirements of managing broadcast equipment operation and set-up procedures, including testing and measurement procedures. Students learn and practice live multicamera operation in live studio and live-streamed broadcast scenarios. Students will also gain an insight into the new and emerging digital broadcast production and distribution technologies. 

Credit Points: 6
Trimester 6

Survivor, Big Brother, My Kitchen Rules, I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here, The Voice, Bondi Vet, Who Wants to be a Millionaire, Married At First Sight, Outback House, Gogglebox Australia… in recent times, there has been some 200 different reality TV series produced in Australia (and at one stage some 20 crime/police series produced in NZ – in the one year!) This research and practical unit seeks to give students a broad appreciation of Australian and New Zealand reality TV production and the role of local and international formats – ensuring students have a foundation from which to create new material or to help secure future production work by equipping them with knowledge of, and networking opportunities from, local productions.

Trimester 5

  • Camera & Lighting 2 FTP302
  • Camera & Lighting 3: Cinematography FTP319
  • Screenwriting 2 FTP307
  • Screenwriting 3: Long Form FTP408
  • Post Production 2 FTP303
  • Producing 2 - FTP401
  • Post Production 3 FTP405
  • Major Project: Post Production FTP426
  • Directing 2 FTP311
  • Major Project: Development FTP316
  • Music Video FTP310
  • Designing for The Screen FTP324
  • The Acting Foundation ACT201
  • Compositing AGA405 
  • Post Production Audio ASP413
  • Internship COL401
  • International Study Tour COL400
  • E-Portfolio COL402

Trimester 6

  • Camera & Lighting 2 FTP302
  • Camera & Lighting 3: Cinematography FTP319
  • Screenwriting 2 FTP307
  • Screenwriting 3: Long Form FTP408
  • Post Production 2 FTP303
  • Producing 2 - FTP401
  • Post Production 3 FTP405
  • Major Project: Post Production FTP426
  • Directing 2 FTP311
  • Major Project: Development FTP316
  • Music Video FTP310
  • Designing for The Screen FTP324
  • The Acting Foundation ACT201
  • Compositing AGA405 
  • Post Production Audio ASP413
  • Internship COL401
  • International Study Tour COL400
  • E-Portfolio COL402

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP203

In this unit, students move beyond merely lighting a scene, to using lighting as a means to express the meaning of the scene. This will require an investigation into the aesthetics of image design, and a more in-depth technical understanding of, and the relationships between, the camera, lenses, and lighting. This unit will provide students with the opportunity to creatively analyse a script and use the camera and lighting to convey emotion, style, and narrative. This unit will be delivered in a combination of in class tutorials, creative workshops and in the studio or on location.

 

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP203, FTP302

This unit has been designed specifically for those students whose professional goal is to be a cinematographer. Students will be required to investigate the application of ultra-high definition digital camera systems to the creative realisation of a motion sequence to industry standard. Students will be required to experiment with the technical elements of production, integrating knowledge and skills to create a cinematic film experience. Students will need to consider their role as cinematographers and how they can use the affordances of film production tools to visually enhance a story with appropriate expression.  

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP206

This unit expands on the knowledge and skills developed in Screenwriting 1. This unit introduces a more sophisticated range of writing tools and techniques, as well as the challenges of writing in collaboration, for an audience, to a budget. This unit will be delivered as a series of workshops designed to simulate professional screenwriting environments and projects. Key to this unit is the work students will do to develop their understanding of the market for their writing, and how to balance creativity with the cost of production (from locations to cast, art department, wardrobe, stunts and VFX/post production elements).

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP206, FTP307

This units builds on FTP206 Screenwriting 1 and FTP307 Screenwriting 2 by offering students the opportunity to complete an original 45-page script for the screen.  

Screenwriting 3 - Long Form aims to prepare advanced students interested in writing longer scripts for the screen, with the professional skills to develop, write, take-on board professional and peer feedback and complete re-writes of an original screenplay. 

This unit seeks to further enhance students’ writing skills and prepare them for a career in the screen industries by building upon the short film scripts students will have written in FTV206 Screenwriting 1 and FTV307 Screenwriting 2, along with scripts they may have written for FTV208 Production Project 1 (Documentary), FTV422 Digital Producing and FTV316 Major Project Development. 

This unit’s key objectives are: 

  1.  Asset-Building.  Successful students will complete this unit having written a first draft longform script which they can further develop after graduation - and to subsequently pitch to professional producers and directors… as well as submit to state funding agencies, studios or other benefactors for further drafts. 
  1. Craft Development.  This unit will give students the tools and skills to refine and enhance their writing skills, previously developed in short form, through specialist lecturer advice and feedback, peer review and re-writes.   

Students will develop skills and knowledge in script writing, editing, and receiving and giving constructive feedback as part of the rigorous development process.  

Students are responsible for making sure they understand all material covered in this unit outline. Students can seek clarification on any aspect they are unsure about from the lecturer or Head of Department. 

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP202

This unit provides students with the opportunity to develop advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of key post production practices, including editing, sound production, colour grading and colour correction.  Students continue to engage with a range of software on different projects to explore advanced editing, colour correction and special effects.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP201

It all starts - and finishes - with the Producer. The Producer is the driving force for all screen productions, setting the goals and steering the creative, financial and administrative processes. The role starts well before pre-production begins and continues (often for many years) after the final product is delivered. 

This unit will build on the foundation knowledge gained in FTP201 Producing 1, to provide students with advanced producing techniques to equip them as emerging Producers upon graduation.

These new skills will include experience at applying for both development funding and production funding from state agencies - along with the essential documentation to accompany these applications (e.g., options & rights agreements, scheduling, budgets, finance plans, HOD agreements, distribution agreements and marketing plans)

Producing 2 will also explore the world of official co-productions: the countries with whom Australia has signed treaties or MOU's and examples of subsequent productions... and the "devil in the details" of making a co-production a reality.  

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP202

This unit offers students the opportunity to understand the collaborative nature of creating and producing broadcast and film title designs, station identities, social media advertising elements and graphics for the screen.  During this unit students develop skills and knowledge in the process involved in responding to return briefs & creating projects from pre-visualisation to effective realisation.  Students also gain hands-on experience with colour grading & correction, and develop and finalise motion graphic sequences for inclusion into their own major projects, helping build a professional portfolio and showreel for prospective employers.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP425

This unit follows on from Major Project: Production as the students’ films enter their final phase. A student’s ability to apply conceptual knowledge and creative and technical skills will be tested through the post production processes of a major production project or slate. Processes will include the rough cut edit, fine cut, music composition, sound editing, sound design, colour grade sound mix, incorporation of credits and online delivery. Throughout the trimester, there will be some directed classes, but most weeks, students will attend scheduled post production meetings with their fellow post crew and lecturer. It is expected that this class will appeal primarily to the producer, director, editor and possibly sound designer of a Major Project Production.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP211

This unit is for students who are interested in further exploring the role of the director in screen productions. The principles of mise-en-scène will be explored in depth, theoretically and practically, covering both formal, classic and informal staging techniques. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their knowledge of the director's 'tool box' which includes advanced visual story, shot construction, camera placement and movement, complex blocking, coverage styles in the classic continuity style as well as the use of subjective time, and poetic/lyrical approaches.

Further areas of study include dramatic tone, production design, sound design, narrative and performance editing, pre-visualisation and on-set workflows and methodologies. They can use these elements to develop and present their own developing directorial voice. 

The unit is delivered as a series of seminars, complemented with practical workshops focusing on ideation, and interpersonal communication techniques between directors and their key collaborators, including the craft of performance. 

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP204, FTP208, FTP304

The unit goes hand-in-hand with Major Project Production and Major Project Post Production, providing students with the opportunity to devise and collaborate on several major creative projects. These project units are designed to showcase the students’ unique skills and talents.  Ideally, the production work will become each student’s “calling card” in the industry.  Major projects can include a studio programme, short film, web series, television or feature film pilot or documentaries, but all productions can be no longer than 10 minutes. This unit is specifically aimed at Directors and Producers who will choose and scope out their projects; work to revise and edit numerous drafts of their script; devise a social media strategy for their project and directly specify their target audience; assign all major roles to their student production; and ultimately pitch their developed project to an industry panel.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: - 

In this unit, students will be given an opportunity to develop their skills in the production of a music video to industry standard. Delivered as a series of workshops and studio sessions, this unit emulates real world practice, with the lecturer adopting the role of record company head. 

Students will be guided through the inner-workings of the music video business – the relationships between label, management, and production company, as well learning how to write and interpret creative briefs. Students will work in collaborative teams to develop their pitch for a music video. Once green-lit, students will plan, pre produce, shoot, and post produce music videos. As part of this process, students will work with their peers in other disciplines in the making of the music video.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: -

Design is an essential element of telling stories on the screen. In this unit, students will study the art of screen design – specifically when it comes to Production Design and Costume Design. Production Design is examined through real world examples and practical exercises. Students will evaluate and create designs in categories such as space, interiors, exteriors, light, colour and set decorating for studio sets and locations. In studying Costume Design, students learn about envisaging character, working with colours, fabrics, and other materials, and collaborating with production designers, actors, and the director. Students will also work to a brief and a budget and will look to utilise their knowledge and experiences in their student productions. This unit will be delivered as a series of tutorials, masterclasses, and workshops (including for example: Special Effects Make-Up).

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: -

This unit introduces the student to the foundation principles of acting, which provide the base from which the actor begins to build their process.

This acting foundation describes freedom and availability as core principles of the actor’s process. This approach to the work requires self-awareness to identify personal limitations or habitual behaviours and to then apply preparatory techniques to enable the actor to respond to stimulus moment to moment.

Students will undertake a range of practical preparation activities and exercises to develop these core skills, as well as developing conceptual understanding of these foundation principles and how these form the basis of the actor’s work. These foundation skills will be applied through both theatre and screen performance exercises and activities.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP303

Digital compositing is the process of combining visual elements into cohesive still and moving images and is integral for any post-production facility. Students are introduced to key areas in compositing, moving from separating and combining still images, to working with complex transparency, camera movement and computer-generated images.  These scaffolded weekly projects prepare students for a proposal and project completed in a para-professional studio environment.

Credit Points: 6
Requirements: FTP207

This unit introduces students to the post production principles of sound for screen and moving image. Students will focus on the use of sound as a form of creative expression and narrative structure. The unit will cover the functional aspects of sound for screen including the various delivery formats for online and platform requirements. Students will analyse the use of sound, and its emotive qualities for screen and moving image.

Credit Points: 6

*by application only

COL401 Internship aims to provide students with an internship opportunity that has sound educational value and provides students the chance to initiate and/or develop relationships with professionals in their discipline. COL401 allows students to prepare or consolidate their know-how to work as a professional and increase their technical and creative skills base. It also allows students to explore potential areas of employment. 

In this unit the National Society for Experiential Education’s definition of “internship” is used. This is internship is a carefully monitored volunteering or working experience where an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what they are learning throughout the experience. For this reason, beside the time students spend during their internship, they will also spend self-study time. They will reflect upon their awareness of applying theory to practice during their internship, practicing their ability to evaluate situations, critical thinking, and effective communication of their decision-making. 

Students will also elaborate a professional plan where they explain their aspiring professional development goals and the activities that would assist them to achieve these under the guidance of their Internship Coordinator/Supervisor.  

Credit Points: 6

*by application only

This subject is a special project based on research, experiences and learning undertaken in conjunction with the overseas academic partners and JMC Academy.  Students will be immersed in two weeks of educational experiences prior to JMC Academy trimester start, hosted by the overseas academic partners. They will cover a range of topics, skills and knowledge taught by industry experts and educators in the students’ area of study (Entertainment Business Management, Music, Design, Film and Television, Audio Engineering, Animation and Game Design). 

On completion of the two weeks of study, students will continue with a 12 week special project on campus at JMC Academy in Australia. 

Individual projects are based on a specific project topic of the student’s choice made in consultation with their term supervisor. That is then developed over the length of the subject. Students will be supervised and will work in conjunction with their supervisor to complete their project (Academic or Practical).

Context

At JMC Academy, students undertake a rigorous academic program of practice-based learning, into which is embedded a range of work-integrated learning activities. To complement their on-campus learning, students are also encouraged to generate their own creative work. This unit of study has been designed to formally recognise that work. Students will have access to an e-portfolio as a presentation mode for the assessable items. The unit is placed during the final study periods of the bachelor’s degree, enabling students to collect and display their best and most recent examples of their engagement with their discipline outside of their formal study.

 

How it works 

Students are introduced to this unit during Trimester 1 and then again in successive study periods. Students must be invited by their Head of Department to enrol in this unit; a student will only be enrolled in this unit if the Head of Department is confident that the student can meet all learning outcomes. The e-portfolio JMC students will be given access to an e-portfolio platform at no cost as part of the Microsoft365 subscription. The platform provides students with a place to curate and display their extra-curricular activities for assessment in this unit. It is not the professional portfolio students could use COL401 Internship aims to provide students with an internship opportunity that has sound educational value and provides students the chance to initiate and/or develop relationships with professionals in their discipline. COL401 allows students to prepare or consolidate their know-how to work as a professional and increase their technical and creative skills base. It also allows students to explore potential areas of employment.



Our Lecturers

Mark Overett

Head of Film & Television (Brisbane)

Mark Overett is a writer/producer and founding partner of Australia/New Zealand production company New Holland Pictures Two. Mark’s films include 6 x AFI Award winning drama “Unfinished Sky” (2007, dir. Peter Duncan); NZ comedy “Separation City” (2009, dir Paul Middleditch), Danish/Australian action/comedy “At World’s End” (2009, dir Tomas Villum Jensen), and Finnish/German/Australian sci-fi comedy “Iron Sky” (2011, dir. Timo Vuorensola), thriller “The Fear of Darkness” (2014, dir. Chris Fitchett). Recently, Mark's film AZZURO, starring Olivia Simone and Grey's Anatomy's Giacomo Gianniotti, won Best International Short Film at the 2018 Santa Monica International Film Festvial.

Mark also likes to keep his toes in documentary production and is currently producing a definitive documentary and concert film of legendary punk band The Saints. He was also Writer/Post Production Supervisor on “ABBA – Bang-A-Boomerang”; and Executive Producer on “Shadow Play – The Making of Anton Corbijn”. He also wrote the UK documentary “Albatross” produced by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds”; and “Running Away” documentary (Ch 9). In 2018

As Script Editor/Script Supervisor, Mark’s credits include some 12 short films including the multi-international award-winning “The Landing” (2013, dir Josh Tanner ); “Maiden” (2013, dir Stephen Kanaris); “The Streak” (2013, dir Michael Gillett) and “Jacob Fights Giants” (2012, dir Janelle Rayner & Simon Toy)

Mark Overett

Head of Film & Television (Brisbane)

Mark Overett is a writer/producer and founding partner of Australia/New Zealand production company New Holland Pictures Two. Mark’s films include 6 x AFI Award winning drama “Unfinished Sky” (2007, dir. Peter Duncan); NZ comedy “Separation City” (2009, dir Paul Middleditch), Danish/Australian action/comedy “At World’s End” (2009, dir Tomas Villum Jensen), and Finnish/German/Australian sci-fi comedy “Iron Sky” (2011, dir. Timo Vuorensola), thriller “The Fear of Darkness” (2014, dir. Chris Fitchett). Recently, Mark's film AZZURO, starring Olivia Simone and Grey's Anatomy's Giacomo Gianniotti, won Best International Short Film at the 2018 Santa Monica International Film Festvial.

Mark also likes to keep his toes in documentary production and is currently producing a definitive documentary and concert film of legendary punk band The Saints. He was also Writer/Post Production Supervisor on “ABBA – Bang-A-Boomerang”; and Executive Producer on “Shadow Play – The Making of Anton Corbijn”. He also wrote the UK documentary “Albatross” produced by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds”; and “Running Away” documentary (Ch 9). In 2018

As Script Editor/Script Supervisor, Mark’s credits include some 12 short films including the multi-international award-winning “The Landing” (2013, dir Josh Tanner ); “Maiden” (2013, dir Stephen Kanaris); “The Streak” (2013, dir Michael Gillett) and “Jacob Fights Giants” (2012, dir Janelle Rayner & Simon Toy)

Peter George

Head of Film & Television (Melbourne)

As a Producer, Director, Writer, Interviewer and Script Editor, Peter brings a resume of credit and awards to JMC Academy. As a filmmaker, major credits include the award winning documentaries Original Schtick, Schtick Happens, The Dream of Love, Not So Straight and The Triangle Wars, and fiction films Absence and William. Original Schtick won 2 AFI awards and the prestigious Rouben Mamoulian Award at the Sydney Film Festival. Almost all of Peter's films have travelled widely around the globe, including Original Schtick and William, which were invited to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

The Triangle War premiered at the Melbourne International Film Festival as part of the MIFF Premiere Fund, and recently won Best Australian Documentary at the inaugural Antenna International Documentary Festival.

In addition to filmmaking, Peter has also worked as a copywriter, a book editor, an industry consultant, an Advertising Account Executive and was the former Editor of If Magazine.

Peter George

Head of Film & Television (Melbourne)

As a Producer, Director, Writer, Interviewer and Script Editor, Peter brings a resume of credit and awards to JMC Academy. As a filmmaker, major credits include the award winning documentaries Original Schtick, Schtick Happens, The Dream of Love, Not So Straight and The Triangle Wars, and fiction films Absence and William. Original Schtick won 2 AFI awards and the prestigious Rouben Mamoulian Award at the Sydney Film Festival. Almost all of Peter's films have travelled widely around the globe, including Original Schtick and William, which were invited to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

The Triangle War premiered at the Melbourne International Film Festival as part of the MIFF Premiere Fund, and recently won Best Australian Documentary at the inaugural Antenna International Documentary Festival.

In addition to filmmaking, Peter has also worked as a copywriter, a book editor, an industry consultant, an Advertising Account Executive and was the former Editor of If Magazine.

Woody Naismith

Acting Head of Film & Television (Sydney)

For almost two decades Woody’s acting roles in film, theatre, and television have not only nurtured his dramatic instinct, they’ve allowed him to explore the dramatic arts extensively. He’s worked on productions in Australia, Tahiti, Japan, the UK, and America before a five-year stint in which he called Hollywood home. Here his acting branched into teaching and film production. 

As a trainer, Woody desires to encourage others to understand their empathetic self by attaining the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. Woody aims to inspire his students to evolve their artistic voice, their creativity and to develop a strong point of view by teaching them a true understanding of themselves and how they relate to their craft. 

Having written, produced, and directed fashion videos, art films, short films, behind-the-scenes, and commercials, Woody has become an experienced camera operator, editor, and colorist. Woody has a keen eye for capturing moments and conveying visually appealing and interesting stories. His work both in front of and behind the camera gives him a great sensibility and understanding of film production. 

Woody Naismith

Acting Head of Film & Television (Sydney)

For almost two decades Woody’s acting roles in film, theatre, and television have not only nurtured his dramatic instinct, they’ve allowed him to explore the dramatic arts extensively. He’s worked on productions in Australia, Tahiti, Japan, the UK, and America before a five-year stint in which he called Hollywood home. Here his acting branched into teaching and film production. 

As a trainer, Woody desires to encourage others to understand their empathetic self by attaining the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. Woody aims to inspire his students to evolve their artistic voice, their creativity and to develop a strong point of view by teaching them a true understanding of themselves and how they relate to their craft. 

Having written, produced, and directed fashion videos, art films, short films, behind-the-scenes, and commercials, Woody has become an experienced camera operator, editor, and colorist. Woody has a keen eye for capturing moments and conveying visually appealing and interesting stories. His work both in front of and behind the camera gives him a great sensibility and understanding of film production. 

Matt Kaylor

Senior Lecturer - Film & Television (Melbourne)

Matt has over 18 years Broadcast experience as a TV studio camera operator, working on some of the UK's most iconic game shows.(Deal or No Deal, Family Fortunes). Since 2008 he has taught Film and Television Production within the further and higher education sectors across the UK.  Matt has been documentary module leader, personal tutor and final year major project supervisor helping guide students into careers in the Film and television Industry.

Matt Kaylor

Senior Lecturer - Film & Television (Melbourne)

Matt has over 18 years Broadcast experience as a TV studio camera operator, working on some of the UK's most iconic game shows.(Deal or No Deal, Family Fortunes). Since 2008 he has taught Film and Television Production within the further and higher education sectors across the UK.  Matt has been documentary module leader, personal tutor and final year major project supervisor helping guide students into careers in the Film and television Industry.

Dr Georgia Wallace-Crabbe

Film & Television and MCI Lecturer

Georgia is an Australian film producer/ director who has collaborated on numerous documentaries, dramas, and television series since graduating from Swinburne (VCA) Film School. She has directed or produced films including CULTIVATING MURDER (feature doc SBS 2018) on land clearing and the murder of an environment officer. Currently working on follow up film about the threatened extinction of koalas. She is a Doctor of Creative Arts from University of Wollongong, where she produced a multi-screen video installation for galleries, The Earth and the Elements (2016), which explored the China-Australia resources export relationship and the concept of interconnectedness, using Chinese philosophy of Daoism as a conceptual framework. She has been a selector, film festival judge, and programmer. 

Dr Georgia Wallace-Crabbe

Film & Television and MCI Lecturer

Georgia is an Australian film producer/ director who has collaborated on numerous documentaries, dramas, and television series since graduating from Swinburne (VCA) Film School. She has directed or produced films including CULTIVATING MURDER (feature doc SBS 2018) on land clearing and the murder of an environment officer. Currently working on follow up film about the threatened extinction of koalas. She is a Doctor of Creative Arts from University of Wollongong, where she produced a multi-screen video installation for galleries, The Earth and the Elements (2016), which explored the China-Australia resources export relationship and the concept of interconnectedness, using Chinese philosophy of Daoism as a conceptual framework. She has been a selector, film festival judge, and programmer. 

Eve Waugh

Film & Television Lecturer

Eve is a Sydney based freelance production designer and animator.

Passionate about design and visual storytelling she graduated from the Australian Film, Television and Radio School in 2013 with a Graduate Diploma in Production Design. Eve has also completed a Masters in Animation from UTS as well as a Bachelor of Design from Monash University.

With a background in animation, illustration and textile design Eve is detail orientated and is known for creating original props and dressing for her projects. She enjoys exploring all aspects of design in film making and collaborating with other film makers.

Eve Waugh

Film & Television Lecturer

Eve is a Sydney based freelance production designer and animator.

Passionate about design and visual storytelling she graduated from the Australian Film, Television and Radio School in 2013 with a Graduate Diploma in Production Design. Eve has also completed a Masters in Animation from UTS as well as a Bachelor of Design from Monash University.

With a background in animation, illustration and textile design Eve is detail orientated and is known for creating original props and dressing for her projects. She enjoys exploring all aspects of design in film making and collaborating with other film makers.

JMC really kicked the door open for me. With solid skills training and industry networking opportunities, JMC really does hold the key to success in this industry.
Charles Duncombe - Head of Creative, SoHO & Showcase Channels - Foxtel Network, 2014 Alumni Award Recipient and Promax and Astra Award Winner
Film & Television Alumni
The foundation I gained at JMC made me feel competent from my first role. Now I drive to work through Hollywood, where I work on amazing projects every day. I have reached my life goal!
Brett Morris - Creative Director, Ranger & Fox
Film & Television Alumni
In two years at JMC, I worked on over 15 projects, most of which I was in a major role. I've learnt how to do so many roles I never even knew about, and been pushed to my creative limits many times.
Rebekah Evans - Film & Television Studio Manager
Film & Television Alumni

Are you ready to take the next step toward your career in Film & Television?

FAQs

No, you do not need to provide any samples of work to be eligible. However, you are welcome to provide samples of work. Any scripts you’ve written, youtube clips, short films, story boards you’ve drawn, visual and written ideas for films or tv shows, and any technical experience you may have had either in school, via extracurricular activities, work experience or volunteer work.

Absolutely. You do not need to have had any experience with film equipment as we cater to all levels of experience.

Our courses are hands on and practical. Students are required to attend classes to receive ongoing mentorship, learn new skills and work with the equipment provided. We do encourage our students to use online study resources, however our courses would not be as immersive as they are without the practical component.

Yes. The JMC Academy is registered and regulated by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) which is Australia’s independent national regulator of the higher education sector, both public and private.

You will not need to purchase your own computer or any film gear as we have fully equipped editing suites and an equipment loan service with quality mics, lighting, cameras and a myriad of accessories available for student use.

Although you may want to be a film maker, it is important to have a wide range of skills when entering the industry. You will still learn about film making in great detail, however this course will provide you with a greater range of career options upon graduation. The skills learnt may be applied to film as well as television production.

You will do a range of assessments that will demonstrate your understanding, including short film making, documentaries, television commercials, music videos, live broadcasts and multi-cam, pitches and presentations, sound recording, film analysis and screenplays. At the end of the Bachelor there is project based work where you'll be able to choose your main assessment, which could be any of the above.

You'll start learning the proper way to handle the film gear in your first Trimester. Students are then assessed on their competency for handling the equipment. Once this is undertaken, students are able to loan cameras and equipment suitable for their on campus or on location shoots, projects and assessments.