About Digital Design

Love design but also enjoy working with technology? This course is all about the design of The Web, Apps, Spaces and Experiences. Everything to do with communicating your ideas and expressing your vision through digital technology. 

In undertaking this course you will be equipped with the design tools to turn your ideas into things that we can not only visualise, touch or hear, but also things we can actively experience..

Merging ever-expansive new technologies into our lives in a way that serves us, rather than frustrating us, is one of the great design challenges of our time. In this course we will explore the boundaries of everyday life and bring new uses to emergent technologies. With our studio based learning, you’ll have an experience that closely emulates the industry you’re preparing to enter. 

Our lecturers come from an industry background, so you’ll receive advice directly from someone who followed the same journey as you are on right now. 

 

Diploma of Design
(Visual Communications)

2 Trimesters
Where / Sydney / Melbourne
Next intake 13/02/2017 / See all intake dates
Entry requirements / Aus / International
This Diploma will take you into the world of digital design in a fun and hands-on way. You’ll have the chance to explore all elements of the design process - from research, ideation, sketching and prototyping, right through to delivery of a digital solution. Removed from traditional classroom learning, you'll enjoy working within a design art-studio environment.
 
You will tackle a series of creative briefs, sketch ideas on paper, and create quick prototypes for testing with a fully realised digital outcome. Along the way, you will learn the detailed processes involved with creating mobile applications, using typography on screen, and creating compelling user experiences.
 
Throughout your Diploma, you will engage with all the digital tools needed for a career in digital design. Along with the Adobe suite, you will also have the opportunity to explore emerging technologies such as augmented reality and wearable devices. 
Diploma of Design
(Visual Communications)
Curriculum
Subject
Design Fundamentals
Design is not just about creating things, it is also method for perceiving the environment around oneself. This subject is an introduction to the underlying language of design. While tackling a series of creative studio based projects, students will playfully explore the principles of design, building their perceptual literacy and creative thinking toolkits.
Digital Toolkit I
This subject underpins many other specialised design subjects by equipping students with the tools of trade used to communicate and turn design ideas into reality. Students will learn hands on digital skills while tackling creative project briefs.
Story Telling
All designed artifacts tell stories, some deliberately and others unconsciously. This subject will explore the relationship between design and narrative. You will undertake a creative brief which will be answered using a narrative driven design approach.
Typography in Design
The way a designer chooses to make language visible has a deep impact on audiences’ perception of the information being transmitted. This subject will explore making typography in a variety of mediums including digital applications. Through a mixture of theory and practice, students will come to develop an understanding of visual language.
Design Communication I
Producing perfect pictures is not the main goal of this subject. Drawing, sketching and modelling play an important role at key moments in the design process. Students will learn to use design communication both as a persuasive device to sell their concept and as a reflective practice throughout the design process.
Digital Toolkit II
This subject underpins many other specialised design subjects by equipping students with the tools of trade used to communicate and turn design ideas into reality. Building on previous subjects students will learn advanced technical skills while tackling industry based projects.
Creative Process
The aim of this subject is to build an awareness of a reliable and thorough creative process. It aims to instil commitment, individual and group, to that process, and to provide working tools for the origination and development of creative projects.

Students will work in small groups, through three distinct stages, towards a Prototype Proposal that deals with the challenge of approaching a creative career. This research exploration will include student backgrounds, interests, aspirations and expectations, then explore the links, similarities and differences between the group members. Creative outcomes will include both individual and group generated content as the result of a design-thinking based structure or information framework that links the research findings. The final outcome of the three stages is a Prototype Proposal that will contain evidence of the creative process applied to the development of a proposed design project. This proposal could be an animated film, a game, a digital interactive work, web site or similar.

Students will undertake three creative stages that will introduce and explore the student groups as young designers today and their pathway into a future career. Each part of this unit will be approached employing a design-thinking methodology. Each phase of the process will be explored employing the following processes and themes: 1. Discover: “What do we like to make?” (sustaining our practice, aspirations and expectations) 2. Ideate: “How do we get our work ‘out there’” (potential strategies, methods for exposure) 3. Prototype: “Strategy, Platforms, Process” (a proposal on how to make it all happen)

The three stages of this project always remains at a development stage and are never taken into actual production, allowing students to focus on the process rather than on the polish of a finished outcome. This also allows them to work with ideas that may not be practical to actually execute, encouraging them to be more ambitious, investigative and inventive.
User Experience Design
Designing for experiences is an holistic approach to design that heavily invests in planning and sketching out an entire user interaction with a product or service. Students will learn build experience prototypes that investigate the interaction of human senses and emotion with designed interfaces.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bachelor of Design
(Visual Communications)

6 trimesters
Where / Sydney / Melbourne
Next intake 13/02/2017 / See all intake dates
Entry requirements / Aus / International

This Bachelor Degree will give you the opportunity to immerse yourself in all the digital tools you need for a future as a digital designer. Learning takes place in an art design studio complete with glass ideation walls. 

While tackling a series of studio-based projects, you’ll be encouraged to explore your creativity, and build your design literacy. You’ll learn hands-on digital skills through a wide range of fun digital projects, and will learn how to use drawing and and digital photography techniques to pitch concepts. You will learn about design research, experience prototyping and design-led social change. You will also explore new and emerging technologies such as 3D printing, near field contact and digital publishing.

Towards the end of your Degree, you will learn some advanced design software skills, and 3D animation. You will also lead your own collaborative project - from initial brief, right through to final delivery. Working alongside experienced professionals will also give you a valuable head start with your career. 

Bachelor of Design
(Visual Communications)
Curriculum
Subject
Design Fundamentals
Design is not just about creating things, it is also method for perceiving the environment around oneself. This subject is an introduction to the underlying language of design. While tackling a series of creative studio based projects, students will playfully explore the principles of design, building their perceptual literacy and creative thinking toolkits.
Digital Toolkit I
This subject underpins many other specialised design subjects by equipping students with the tools of trade used to communicate and turn design ideas into reality. Students will learn hands on digital skills while tackling creative project briefs.
Story Telling
All designed artifacts tell stories, some deliberately and others unconsciously. This subject will explore the relationship between design and narrative. You will undertake a creative brief which will be answered using a narrative driven design approach.
Typography in Design
The way a designer chooses to make language visible has a deep impact on audiences’ perception of the information being transmitted. This subject will explore making typography in a variety of mediums including digital applications. Through a mixture of theory and practice, students will come to develop an understanding of visual language.
Design Communication I
Producing perfect pictures is not the main goal of this subject. Drawing, sketching and modelling play an important role at key moments in the design process. Students will learn to use design communication both as a persuasive device to sell their concept and as a reflective practice throughout the design process.
Digital Toolkit II
This subject underpins many other specialised design subjects by equipping students with the tools of trade used to communicate and turn design ideas into reality. Building on previous subjects students will learn advanced technical skills while tackling industry based projects.
Creative Process
The aim of this subject is to build an awareness of a reliable and thorough creative process. It aims to instil commitment, individual and group, to that process, and to provide working tools for the origination and development of creative projects.

Students will work in small groups, through three distinct stages, towards a Prototype Proposal that deals with the challenge of approaching a creative career. This research exploration will include student backgrounds, interests, aspirations and expectations, then explore the links, similarities and differences between the group members. Creative outcomes will include both individual and group generated content as the result of a design-thinking based structure or information framework that links the research findings. The final outcome of the three stages is a Prototype Proposal that will contain evidence of the creative process applied to the development of a proposed design project. This proposal could be an animated film, a game, a digital interactive work, web site or similar.

Students will undertake three creative stages that will introduce and explore the student groups as young designers today and their pathway into a future career. Each part of this unit will be approached employing a design-thinking methodology. Each phase of the process will be explored employing the following processes and themes: 1. Discover: “What do we like to make?” (sustaining our practice, aspirations and expectations) 2. Ideate: “How do we get our work ‘out there’” (potential strategies, methods for exposure) 3. Prototype: “Strategy, Platforms, Process” (a proposal on how to make it all happen)

The three stages of this project always remains at a development stage and are never taken into actual production, allowing students to focus on the process rather than on the polish of a finished outcome. This also allows them to work with ideas that may not be practical to actually execute, encouraging them to be more ambitious, investigative and inventive.
User Experience Design
Designing for experiences is an holistic approach to design that heavily invests in planning and sketching out an entire user interaction with a product or service. Students will learn build experience prototypes that investigate the interaction of human senses and emotion with designed interfaces.
Design Communication II
Building on previous subjects, students will learn to produce more finished concept art, mock ups and prototypes for presentation to clients and the general public.
Digital Toolkit III
Merging ever-expanding technologies into our lives in a way that serves rather than frustrates us is one of the emerging design challenges of our time. In this subject, students will explore the boundaries of everyday life and bring new uses to emergent technologies.
Design History & Theory
In this subject students will engage with the key art and design movements, practitioners and theories spanning from the late 1890's to contemporary practice. This subject provides students with the skills of research, writing and cultural critique.
Interactive Design
Building on previous subjects’ exploration of user experience, this subject asks students to create a digitally interactive space.
Information Design
Creatively visualised information can be beautiful, and by shaping data into a visualisation designers allow their audience to see the stories hidden behind the numbers. Currently all around us useful data is lying dormant – this subject asks students to research, identify and express data in an innovative way.
3D Forms and Spaces I
Creating environments that give us appropriate tactile, visual or otherwise sensory feedback is an exciting new area of design. In this subject you will create an intervention in a public space that actively engages passers by.
The Reinvention of 'Cool'
The purpose of this unit is to review and critically analyse the history, culture, fashion, people and business of “Cool”. By exploring contemporary cultural theory, the student will investigate the personalities, the symbols, and the society that contribute to current occidental notions of “Cool”.

The concept of “Cool” as an extremely complex yet fleeting proposition that underpins the vast majority of new trends in fashion, style, music and art is explored. Throughout this unit, students will study the social impact of MTV, hip hop, and street fashion, as well as the media giants, music and film producers. This study will be delivered in the context of enabling the students to understand and develop their own contribution to the business of “cool”.
Design for Society
Design is not only about products,
it is a methodology for achieving positive social and ecological change. Through research and studio projects this subject will explore design led social change.
Digital Imaging
Contemporary designers use digital photography as part of their everyday toolkit. In this subject you will learn to use digital photographic techniques and workflows whilst creatively answering a project brief. Exploring the principles of light, space, tension and composition to produce design concepts and finished digital assets.
3D Forms and Spaces II
3D Printing has had a profound impact in the mechanical design fields, but not until recently have designers and artists begun to use 3D printing for more conceptual work. In this specialist subject students will incorporate 3D printing into their conceptual design development.
Design for Community
Designing for diverse groups holds its own challenges. Working in teams, students will be given a design challenge with a specific community to design for. A major part of this project will be conducting user research amongst the target group.
Specialised Project
Developing a strong creative vision and collaborating effectively with a team to act on that vision is key to successful design outcomes. In this subject you will undertake project from research and conception to client feedback and re-design, right through to delivery.
Industry Project
Industry based project.

Careers in the Industry

Graduates may find employment with

Upon graduation you will be able to explore opportunities with digital agencies, in advertising, publishing, media production or retail. Previous graduates with strong digital design skills now work with companies such as HBO, ZSpace and Capacity working with global brands like NBC, Coca Cola and Nike.

Other organisations with roles for Digital Designers include Network 10, Channel 9, Fox Studios and Viskatoons. 

Some individuals have chosen to successfully run their own small studios and freelance. With a finely honed balance between theoretical and practical knowledge, JMC Academy graduates are well prepared for rapid progress. 

Specific roles may include

User Experience (UX) Designer
Interaction Designer
Digital Producer
Web Designer
App Designer
Retail Designer
Point of Sale (POS) Designer
Exhibition Designer
Events Designer
3D Visualiser
Design Entrepreneur
Media Artist

Student testimonials

  • "This course is very hands on. It’s new and really quite different to anything I've looked at studying before. Right now I'm already working on a prototype for an App!”
    Savannah Lee | Digital Design student
  • “I really like the size of the campus. It has a really creative vibe and the classes are intimate, not massive like some other places”
    Adam AK | Digital Design student

Faqs

What equipment or resources will I need for the Design course?

You will need to bring the following to your course:

Laptop: Macbook Pro or Air (running latest OS) is preferred, however suitably powered PC laptops are acceptable. 
Device: Smartphone or Tablet
Journal: B5 size Blank pages
Pen: Felt-tip 0.3-0.5
Pencil: HB-2B

JMC will supply you with the Adobe CC software

Do I need a portfolio of work to apply for the Design course?
At application, we are most keen to learn about your passion and reasons for wanting to study design. We are of course more than happy to have a look at any samples of work you might have to show us. This could include a piece of writing, a blog about design or a collection of photographs - something that shows us that you are interested in design, and that you have the commitment to take your interest further through study.
Do I need to learn coding to be eligible for the Design course?
No. We equip you with digital tools that allow you to create high-functioning prototypes without coding. 
How will I connect with industry while studying the Design course?
We are committed to strengthening our Design Industry connections by fostering both internships and industry based projects. 
How much theory VS practice is there in the Design course?
This course is very hands on and you will tackle real world creative projects. However, having a foundational understanding of design theory is still vitally important. There is approximately a 25% (theory) to 75% (practice) balance.
Are there exams in the Design course?
No. We assess your work as would happen in the workplace via proposal documents, presentations and demonstrations. 
Do I need to be able to draw to be eligible for the Design course?
As with any design you will need to communicate ideas via drawing and sketching. We teach sketching techniques right from the beginning.