22
Dec
Jobs you can get from studying Audio Engineering and Sound Production

There is a heap of incredible jobs you could go into from studying Audio Engineering and Sound Production audio.jpgincluding the obvious audio engineer and sound producer, but what else?

Dive into the wonderful world of where audio can take you… 


Audio forensics

Forensic Audio Engineers analyse files for continuity and tampering, cleaning very poor quality recorded audio and enhancing dialogue on covert recordings. JMC Academy alumni Chris Jackson free-lances as a forensic audio engineer for New South Wales Police and says ‘It is simultaneously one of the coolest and yet (sometimes) creepiest things I’ve ever done. I’ve been very lucky to work in almost every area of audio from band recordings, to post productions, to now doing Forensic audio for the NSW Police. I am given whatever audio the department need fixing which could be an audio bug in a car, a phone in a pocket, or even CTV footage. The audio will usually have a very quiet voice/s, or lots of noise and crackle that take up all the information that the voice/s would usually be in.  The officers will tell me what area specifically need to be focused on and I’ll go through a series of noise reduction plugins, eq, limiting, and manual edits to remove as much unwanted sounds as possible.’

Live sound engineer

Live sound engineers operate the front of house or fold back mixing consoles during a live performance, sound checks, and are also responsible for the placing of equipment in preparation for a live production. This work is required for festivals, theatre shows, concerts, comedy shows or any live production that requires sound. 

Acousticians

Engineering acoustics deals with sound waves moving within a space, utilizing sound measuring instruments of all kinds. An acoustician ‘treats’ a room through calculating angles and sound reflections to get rid of unwanted frequencies and to make a room ‘feel’ live or dead. They can tune rooms to whatever the space needs, for example the music will appear quieter at the bar so you can order your drinks, or louder at the dance floor, or even tune a room so that a voice on a stage can be heard at the back of a 1000 person audience. 


Audiologist

Audiologists test hearing and assess the nature of hearing disorders. They are responsible for the non-medical management and rehabilitation of hearing loss and associated disorders of communication.  They are also responsible for the creation and administration sound loss prevention tools.


Military intelligence Audio Engineer

Radar and sonar operators monitor the sophisticated equipment that bounce radio or sound waves off objects to determine their location and to measure distance. This can be used for many things such as tracking aircraft and missiles, determining positions of ships and submarines, directing artillery fire, forecasting weather, and aiding navigation. 


Recording/Studio Engineer

Recording engineers work in recording studios, often working equipment necessary for capturing voice or instrumental performances. Recording studios may specialize in recording professional musicians, voices and/or jingles for television commercials, or even voices and/or music for video games.  

Post Production

Post Production Audio Engineers specialise in Foley, Automatic dialogue replacement (ADR) and general sound effect. The tools of audio post production can be as low tech as a fist and a sirloin steak (for the most realistic punches) or as high tech as a sprawling mixing console powered by the latest digital editing software.


Remember, wherever there is sound, there is an audio engineer and therefore, a job available. 


For more information on studying Audio Engineering and Sound Production at JMC Academy click here… 

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